out of print
PfeilMichael Rohde
 

The Great Evans Gambit Debate



Catalogue
Content
Catalogue german flag

The Evans Gambit is one of White's boldest attempts to gain the initiative through an unrelenting series of hammer blows aimed at the Black position. In the past it was considered that "Lasker's Defense" would save Black from imminent disaster and inflict fits own brand of counterattack. However, new research by Grandmaster Michael Rohde has opted for a move which puts the violent assault back into White's hands. See how Rohde documents Black's attempts to stop this steam-roller... And then watch how he counteracts these move! with original, brave new analysis. Concurrently he takes on theoreticians GM Chandler, Harding, Moody, an others in a spirited debate to rehabilitate White lay after World Champion Garry Kasparov was twice successful in downing several top grandmasters in just the past few years. The play is sharp, brutal and requires respect and skill. GM Michael Rohde lives in New York City. When Kasparov crushed Anand in the Tal Memorial at Riga 1995 in their last tournament game before their 1995 World. Championship Match, he sparked an amazing debate concerning the strength of the Evans Gambit, that most "romantic" of all chess openings. After dutifully reporting on the Kasparov— Anand game in my "Game of the Month" column which appeared in the July, 1995 issue of Chess Life, I found myself unwittingly drawn into this web, as Evans Gambit analysts everywhere pounced on my mainstream analysis like coyotes on a fresh piece of meat. Because the conclusions of other analysts left me dazed and confused, I became determined to take on the task of getting to the bottom of the Evans Gambit controversy.

"Compensation" is one of the most elusive concepts in chess. Generally it refers to the amount of play or attacking potential which one side has, to compensate it for a material deficit. Because compensation is so hard to evaluate, the Evans Gambit, in which White sacrifices his b-pawn for quicker center formation, development and the attack, has defied the attempts of a century of theoreticians to determine its strength. During this time, chess has come full circle. The romantic players of the mid-nineteenth century, such as Paul Morphy and Adolf Anderssen, were happy playing either side of the Gambit invented in 1824 by Captain William Evans. Wilhelm Steinitz, the world's first complete defensive player, developed a penchant for accepting the Gambit, although he suffered some terrible losses against the talented attacker Mikhail Chigorin. Early 20th century technicians such as Emanuel Lasker and Siegbert Tarrasch drove the Evans Gambit from the scene, with the famous "Lasker's Defence", and by the time of Capablanca, Reti, Nimzovich and the hypermoderns, the Evans Gambit became an antiquated weapon. During the Bobby Fischer era, his cohort GM Larry Evans (no relation to the Captain) educated a generation of chess players that all that has to be done about gambits is to accept them.

Deep research into the Evans Gambit, spearheaded by World Champion Garry Kasparov, has shown that (1) Black has no clear path to equality, and (2) the practical problems facing Black are such that the Evans is now a fully viable weapon in the hands of today's Grandmasters. This has come about through a new approach to the meaning of compensation, where each position is judged individually, and GMs willingly accept being material down, as long as the opponent is facing definable problems.

This book is divided into 6 Parts, and it is a good idea to get an idea at the outset of the flavor of each part. After the moves 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 the choice of Bishop retreats is defining. Part 1 concerns 5... Ba5 which for many years has been considered to be a sound and active, and the best defense. The problem with the Bishop placement on a5 is that Black does not have the critical move ...Nc6-a5 needed to knock out the pressure of White's Queen and Bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal; often Black will play an early ... Ba5-b6 to enable this resource.

Part 2 is 5... Be7 which had been favored by professional players as the safest reply to the Evans Gambit, but has become the topic of a hot debate after the game Kasparov - Anand from Riga which continued 6 d4 Na5 7 Be2!!. Although the Bishop stays out of trouble on e7, Black's difficulties arise from his inability to play the f7-defending move ...Qd8-e7, and because of the passive placement of Black's pieces, White usually obtains a central initiative due to strong pressure against the e5 pawn.

Part 3, 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Bc5, was for a long time considered the most laughable of Black's Bishop retreats, because White will just kick it again with d2-d4. But Black does avoid the quick hammering of f7, as Black's other pieces are not hampered, and the loss of tempo with .. .Bc5-b6 after White pushes his d-pawn mirrors the tempi in ...Ba5 lines where the Bishop later retreats. In the 5... Bc5 line, Black plays meekly and hopes that his extra pawn, rather than White's big center and scoping pieces, will prove the most significant, and this way well be Black's best method of countering the Evans.

Part 4 covers the almost well-founded 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Bd6, in which Black is determined to steer clear of the problems associated with the other Bishop retreats.

Part 5 details the play following the decline of the Gambit with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bb6. In this line, White is not obligated to continue in "Gambit style," and he can play for a normal space advantage instead.

Part 6 deals -with odds and ends, including unusual responses to the Evans Gambit by Black, isolated analysis nuggets including a horrible loss in a blitz game by Bobby Fischer on the Black side of the Evans, and some of the most classic games played in the Evans Gambit.

Michael Rohde New York, February 1997

The Evans Gambit is one of White's boldest attempts to gain the initiative through an unrelenting series of hammer blows aimed at the Black position. In the past it was considered that "Lasker's Defense" would save Black from imminent disaster and inflict fits own brand of counterattack. However, new research by Grandmaster Michael Rohde has opted for a move which puts the violent assault back into White's hands. See how Rohde documents Black's attempts to stop this steam-roller... And then watch how he counteracts these move! with original, brave new analysis. Concurrently he takes on theoreticians GM Chandler, Harding, Moody, an others in a spirited debate to rehabilitate White lay after World Champion Garry Kasparov was twice successful in downing several top grandmasters in just the past few years. The play is sharp, brutal and requires respect and skill. GM Michael Rohde lives in New York City. When Kasparov crushed Anand in the Tal Memorial at Riga 1995 in their last tournament game before their 1995 World. Championship Match, he sparked an amazing debate concerning the strength of the Evans Gambit, that most "romantic" of all chess openings. After dutifully reporting on the Kasparov— Anand game in my "Game of the Month" column which appeared in the July, 1995 issue of Chess Life, I found myself unwittingly drawn into this web, as Evans Gambit analysts everywhere pounced on my mainstream analysis like coyotes on a fresh piece of meat. Because the conclusions of other analysts left me dazed and confused, I became determined to take on the task of getting to the bottom of the Evans Gambit controversy.

"Compensation" is one of the most elusive concepts in chess. Generally it refers to the amount of play or attacking potential which one side has, to compensate it for a material deficit. Because compensation is so hard to evaluate, the Evans Gambit, in which White sacrifices his b-pawn for quicker center formation, development and the attack, has defied the attempts of a century of theoreticians to determine its strength. During this time, chess has come full circle. The romantic players of the mid-nineteenth century, such as Paul Morphy and Adolf Anderssen, were happy playing either side of the Gambit invented in 1824 by Captain William Evans. Wilhelm Steinitz, the world's first complete defensive player, developed a penchant for accepting the Gambit, although he suffered some terrible losses against the talented attacker Mikhail Chigorin. Early 20th century technicians such as Emanuel Lasker and Siegbert Tarrasch drove the Evans Gambit from the scene, with the famous "Lasker's Defence", and by the time of Capablanca, Reti, Nimzovich and the hypermoderns, the Evans Gambit became an antiquated weapon. During the Bobby Fischer era, his cohort GM Larry Evans (no relation to the Captain) educated a generation of chess players that all that has to be done about gambits is to accept them.

Deep research into the Evans Gambit, spearheaded by World Champion Garry Kasparov, has shown that (1) Black has no clear path to equality, and (2) the practical problems facing Black are such that the Evans is now a fully viable weapon in the hands of today's Grandmasters. This has come about through a new approach to the meaning of compensation, where each position is judged individually, and GMs willingly accept being material down, as long as the opponent is facing definable problems.

This book is divided into 6 Parts, and it is a good idea to get an idea at the outset of the flavor of each part. After the moves 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 the choice of Bishop retreats is defining. Part 1 concerns 5... Ba5 which for many years has been considered to be a sound and active, and the best defense. The problem with the Bishop placement on a5 is that Black does not have the critical move ...Nc6-a5 needed to knock out the pressure of White's Queen and Bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal; often Black will play an early ... Ba5-b6 to enable this resource.

Part 2 is 5... Be7 which had been favored by professional players as the safest reply to the Evans Gambit, but has become the topic of a hot debate after the game Kasparov - Anand from Riga which continued 6 d4 Na5 7 Be2!!. Although the Bishop stays out of trouble on e7, Black's difficulties arise from his inability to play the f7-defending move ...Qd8-e7, and because of the passive placement of Black's pieces, White usually obtains a central initiative due to strong pressure against the e5 pawn.

Part 3, 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Bc5, was for a long time considered the most laughable of Black's Bishop retreats, because White will just kick it again with d2-d4. But Black does avoid the quick hammering of f7, as Black's other pieces are not hampered, and the loss of tempo with .. .Bc5-b6 after White pushes his d-pawn mirrors the tempi in ...Ba5 lines where the Bishop later retreats. In the 5... Bc5 line, Black plays meekly and hopes that his extra pawn, rather than White's big center and scoping pieces, will prove the most significant, and this way well be Black's best method of countering the Evans.

Part 4 covers the almost well-founded 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Bd6, in which Black is determined to steer clear of the problems associated with the other Bishop retreats.

Part 5 details the play following the decline of the Gambit with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bb6. In this line, White is not obligated to continue in "Gambit style," and he can play for a normal space advantage instead.

Part 6 deals -with odds and ends, including unusual responses to the Evans Gambit by Black, isolated analysis nuggets including a horrible loss in a blitz game by Bobby Fischer on the Black side of the Evans, and some of the most classic games played in the Evans Gambit.

Michael Rohde New York, February 1997

Evans Gambit

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4

Accepted

10 Part 1: 4... Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. 0-0 / d4 / Qb3

26 Part 2: 4... Bxb4 5. c3 Be7 6. d4 / Qb3

40 Part 3: 4... Bxb4 5. c3 Bc5 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 (7. 0-0) Bb6

8. 0-0 a6 9. Nc3 / d5 / Re1 / h3 / Bb2

50 Part 4: 4... Bxb45. c3 Bd6 6. d4

Declined

56 Part 5: 4... Bb6 5. a4 / b5 / Bb2

Odds & Ends 64 Part 6: Accepted and Declined

80 Bibliography

81 Variations Index

83 Games - Chronology Index

86 Colophon




Price: 
 
Article number:
LOROHTGEGD
 
Category:
Pfeilopenings
  PfeilItalian Game
  ECO: C50-C54

    PfeilEvans Gambit
    ECO: C51-C52
 
Language:
English
 
Publisher:
PfeilThinkers' Press
 
ISBN-10:
0938650750
 
ISBN-13:
 
width: 
15.4 cm
 
height: 
22.8 cm
 
weight: 
0.200 kg
 
Michael Rohde: The Great Evans Gambit Debate
86 pages, paperback, 1st edition 1997, original edition 1997, First edition 1997.
nach oben - to the top  Top