Tel: (02501) 9288 320

Wir beraten Sie gern!

Wir sind für Sie da

Montag bis Samstag geöffnet

Versandkostenfrei

Innerhalb Deutschlands ab 50 €

Warenkorb
Warenkorb
Ihr Warenkorb ist leer.

Sie haben keine Artikel im Warenkorb.

Zwischensumme
0,00 €

Willkommen in unserem neu gestalteten Online-Shop! Haben Sie Anmerkungen, Fragen oder technische Schwierigkeiten? Schreiben Sie uns gern an info@schachversand.de.

Zur bisherigen Oberfläche geht es hier entlang.

Art.-Nr.: LOLANTSGE
Vergriffen

The Scotch Game Explained

168 Seiten, kartoniert, Batsford Chess, 1. Auflage 2005.

19,40 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

Dieser Artikel ist sowohl bei uns als auch beim Verlag bzw. Hersteller ausverkauft. Wir können ihn daher auch nicht mehr bestellen.

The Scotch Game is a popular, low-maintenance opening that allows White to create an open game with plenty of attacking opportunities. It has long been used by world Champions such as Garry Kasparov, and has a bright future with a new generation of players including American Champion Hikaru Nakamura along with Teimour Radjabov and Sergey Karjakin. Having proved its worth at international level, it has now become a firm favourite with club and tournament players.

In this entertaining book, bestselling author and Australian chess Champion Gary Lane provides back-to-basics information on how to use this important opening to its best advantage. The key plans and ideas are explored in clear, easy-to-follow text - ideal for players who are looking to improve their game. The book includes:

  • Explanations of the basic plan and strategies for both sides

  • Model games that teach you how to create an advantage

  • What to do when your Opponent fails to play the main lines

  • How to spot the possible pitfalls

Australian Player of the Year 2004 and International Master Gary Lane is a prolific chess writer. An openings expert, he has been awarded the Chess Journalist of America award fer Best Analysis, Opening. He is a popular coach for the English junior and Australian teams, and has written many books, including Ideas Behind Modern Chess Openings, The Bishop's Opening Explained and Find the Winning Move, all published by Batsford.

____________

Introduction:

"The Scotch is an old opening which has been revived and revitalised with modern ideas to make it a reliable System with opportunities for attack.

The Scotch occurs after the moves1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4

History

Though first mentioned by Del Rio in 1750, it was the Scottish player John Cochrane (1798-1878) who made the opening popular after recommending that the London Chess Club play it against Edinburgh in a major correspondence match which took place from 1824-28. Thereafter it was immediately recognised as an effective opening weapon - indeed the Edinburgh players also employed it in the match and their success is the reason for its current name! In the intervening years it has fluctuated in popularity but the 1960s saw Radulov, Savon and Kupreichik successfully resurrect the relatively forgotten System. This was followed in the 1970s and 1980s by Dutch players Van der Wiel and Timman promoting the opening and giving it quite a decent reputation. However it was the great Garry Kasparov who gave the Scotch its biggest boost when in the 1990s he used it in three world championship matches and inspired a whole new generation to follow his example. Indeed when Kasparov first sprung his surprise weapon on Karpov at Lyon 1990 it was nothing short of a Sensation. Armed with his fantastic analytical skills it seemed that the world champion could unleash forgotten, almost historical, lines at will - and still gain dynamic attacking chances. Thanks to Kasparov's example, the Scotch is today established as a formidable opening, attracting the attention of even the world's leading players.

How the Games Were Selected

Originally I intended to update my 1993 book Winning with the Scotch but I soon realised that merely adding new references was not a practical solution as the subsequent huge turnover of ideas demanded a complete overhaul of the book. And this was not the only problem. I also discovered that I did not have the earlier manuscript in a usuable electronic format because it was done on an Amstrad Word Processor which had long been thrown out! I therefore set about writing a completely new book which would give lots of ideas to newcomers to the opening as well as club players eager to expand their repertoire.

What to Play

My objective is to provide readers with a range of ideas to suit all kinds of playing styles. For instance, in the game Radjabov-Karjakin, Dos Hermanas 2005, we see the popular Mieses Variation which occurs after 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nxc6 bxc6 6 e5 Qe7 7 Qe2 Nd8 8 c4 Nb6 - and now 9 Nc3 is my recommendation.

I think bringing the knight to c3 is a decent way to pursue the advantage. It also has the merit of being easier to remember because it is more logical than some of the other complicated lines. Radjabov is one of the world's top players so it certainly reflects the latest fashion. If a potential Opponent tries to look up a possible retort he will have no luck in the Standard reference books such as Nunn 's Chess Openings because it is not even mentioned! Maybe someone will do better by looking it up in the latest edition of Modern Chess Openings but even there it is considered a side-line with only a brief mention.

I have tried to provide alternatives for the White player who has no wish to enter sharp lines. This is the reason why the Scotch Four Knights is given in detail so that one can choose a line with a few tricks in the opening but with the main contest actually taking place in the middlegame. This Variation has been neglected in some sources but continues to attract some of the brightest stars in chess such as the 2005 USA Champion Hikaru Nakamura.

...

The lines with 4...Bc5 are popular so I have looked at three alternatives for White.

Now this might be a familiar sight for some who follow the Classical Variation occurring after 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 4 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Bc5 5 Be3 Qf6 6 c3 Nge7 7 Bc4 and indeed it leads to some interesting tactics. However, White can also play a solid Variation with scope for an attack by continuing 5 Nb3, as for example in Zhang Pengxiang - Moradiabadi, Dubai 2005:

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4 Bc5 5 Nb3 Bb6 6 Nc3 d6 7 a4

The idea is to threaten the bishop with a4-a5 and if in reply he creates an escape square by a7-a6 then Nd5 will force a retreat unless Black wants to play the rest of the game with a buckled pawn structure.

7...a6 8 Nd5 9 Qf3!?

Another example illustrating how the Scotch can appeal to all tastes - from those who want the opening to be critical to players who prefer to postpone the battle for supremacy until the middlegame.

If you want a more positional repertoire then I would suggest 5 Nb3 against 4....Bc5 and the Scotch Four Knights against 4....Nf6.

There are bound to be opponents who will want to avoid your opening and try something different and I have made an effort to cover these offbeat replies because in my experience weekend tournament players like to try their luck with unusual ideas. Perhaps one that has more credibility than most is the Steinitz:

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 Qh4

I used to play this line as Black so I know what is wrong with it! Basically, White has to accept that he will lose the e-pawn but in return he will gain an advantage in development and a strong initiative. The critical position arises upon 5 Nc3 Bb4 6 Be2 Qxe4 7 Ndb5 Bxc3+ 8 bxc3 Kd8

Black is obliged to move bis king, thus forfeiting the right to castle. Frankly, the number of miniatures won by White makes this an exciting way to pick up an easy point.

In the Other Black Defences chapter I point out that the beginner's move 4....Nxd4 can in fact transpose to a line favoured by the Bosnian Grandmaster Ivan Sokolov, whereas 4...g6 transposes into a Pirc Defence against which I suggest the aggressive 150 Attack. I also have taken time to discuss the timid 3...d6 which is often played by aspiring players.

Conclusion

The Scotch is well suited to the kind of player who seeks a forcing type of game with ambitions of attack. I have endeavoured to provide a repertoire for White that requires low maintenance and can be learned in a weekend. The Scotch does have some heavily analysed variations and while I have mentioned them, the emphasis remains on Systems that are easy to play and will allow White to emerge frorn the opening with promising prospects."

The Scotch Game is a popular, low-maintenance opening that allows White to create an open game with plenty of attacking opportunities. It has long been used by world Champions such as Garry Kasparov, and has a bright future with a new generation of players including American Champion Hikaru Nakamura along with Teimour Radjabov and Sergey Karjakin. Having proved its worth at international level, it has now become a firm favourite with club and tournament players.

In this entertaining book, bestselling author and Australian chess Champion Gary Lane provides back-to-basics information on how to use this important opening to its best advantage. The key plans and ideas are explored in clear, easy-to-follow text - ideal for players who are looking to improve their game. The book includes:

  • Explanations of the basic plan and strategies for both sides

  • Model games that teach you how to create an advantage

  • What to do when your Opponent fails to play the main lines

  • How to spot the possible pitfalls

Australian Player of the Year 2004 and International Master Gary Lane is a prolific chess writer. An openings expert, he has been awarded the Chess Journalist of America award fer Best Analysis, Opening. He is a popular coach for the English junior and Australian teams, and has written many books, including Ideas Behind Modern Chess Openings, The Bishop's Opening Explained and Find the Winning Move, all published by Batsford.

________________

Introduction:

"The Scotch is an old opening which has been revived and revitalised with modern ideas to make it a reliable System with opportunities for attack.

The Scotch occurs after the moves1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4

History

Though first mentioned by Del Rio in 1750, it was the Scottish player John Cochrane (1798-1878) who made the opening popular after recommending that the London Chess Club play it against Edinburgh in a major correspondence match which took place from 1824-28. Thereafter it was immediately recognised as an effective opening weapon - indeed the Edinburgh players also employed it in the match and their success is the reason for its current name! In the intervening years it has fluctuated in popularity but the 1960s saw Radulov, Savon and Kupreichik successfully resurrect the relatively forgotten System. This was followed in the 1970s and 1980s by Dutch players Van der Wiel and Timman promoting the opening and giving it quite a decent reputation. However it was the great Garry Kasparov who gave the Scotch its biggest boost when in the 1990s he used it in three world championship matches and inspired a whole new generation to follow his example. Indeed when Kasparov first sprung his surprise weapon on Karpov at Lyon 1990 it was nothing short of a Sensation. Armed with his fantastic analytical skills it seemed that the world champion could unleash forgotten, almost historical, lines at will - and still gain dynamic attacking chances. Thanks to Kasparov's example, the Scotch is today established as a formidable opening, attracting the attention of even the world's leading players.

How the Games Were Selected

Originally I intended to update my 1993 book Winning with the Scotch but I soon realised that merely adding new references was not a practical solution as the subsequent huge turnover of ideas demanded a complete overhaul of the book. And this was not the only problem. I also discovered that I did not have the earlier manuscript in a usuable electronic format because it was done on an Amstrad Word Processor which had long been thrown out! I therefore set about writing a completely new book which would give lots of ideas to newcomers to the opening as well as club players eager to expand their repertoire.

What to Play

My objective is to provide readers with a range of ideas to suit all kinds of playing styles. For instance, in the game Radjabov-Karjakin, Dos Hermanas 2005, we see the popular Mieses Variation which occurs after 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nxc6 bxc6 6 e5 Qe7 7 Qe2 Nd8 8 c4 Nb6 - and now 9 Nc3 is my recommendation.

I think bringing the knight to c3 is a decent way to pursue the advantage. It also has the merit of being easier to remember because it is more logical than some of the other complicated lines. Radjabov is one of the world's top players so it certainly reflects the latest fashion. If a potential Opponent tries to look up a possible retort he will have no luck in the Standard reference books such as Nunn 's Chess Openings because it is not even mentioned! Maybe someone will do better by looking it up in the latest edition of Modern Chess Openings but even there it is considered a side-line with only a brief mention.

I have tried to provide alternatives for the White player who has no wish to enter sharp lines. This is the reason why the Scotch Four Knights is given in detail so that one can choose a line with a few tricks in the opening but with the main contest actually taking place in the middlegame. This Variation has been neglected in some sources but continues to attract some of the brightest stars in chess such as the 2005 USA Champion Hikaru Nakamura.

...

The lines with 4...Bc5 are popular so I have looked at three alternatives for White.

Now this might be a familiar sight for some who follow the Classical Variation occurring after 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 4 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Bc5 5 Be3 Qf6 6 c3 Nge7 7 Bc4 and indeed it leads to some interesting tactics. However, White can also play a solid Variation with scope for an attack by continuing 5 Nb3, as for example in Zhang Pengxiang - Moradiabadi, Dubai 2005:

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4 Bc5 5 Nb3 Bb6 6 Nc3 d6 7 a4

The idea is to threaten the bishop with a4-a5 and if in reply he creates an escape square by a7-a6 then Nd5 will force a retreat unless Black wants to play the rest of the game with a buckled pawn structure.

7...a6 8 Nd5 9 Qf3!?

Another example illustrating how the Scotch can appeal to all tastes - from those who want the opening to be critical to players who prefer to postpone the battle for supremacy until the middlegame.

If you want a more positional repertoire then I would suggest 5 Nb3 against 4....Bc5 and the Scotch Four Knights against 4....Nf6.

There are bound to be opponents who will want to avoid your opening and try something different and I have made an effort to cover these offbeat replies because in my experience weekend tournament players like to try their luck with unusual ideas. Perhaps one that has more credibility than most is the Steinitz:

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 Qh4

I used to play this line as Black so I know what is wrong with it! Basically, White has to accept that he will lose the e-pawn but in return he will gain an advantage in development and a strong initiative. The critical position arises upon 5 Nc3 Bb4 6 Be2 Qxe4 7 Ndb5 Bxc3+ 8 bxc3 Kd8

Black is obliged to move bis king, thus forfeiting the right to castle. Frankly, the number of miniatures won by White makes this an exciting way to pick up an easy point.

In the Other Black Defences chapter I point out that the beginner's move 4....Nxd4 can in fact transpose to a line favoured by the Bosnian Grandmaster Ivan Sokolov, whereas 4...g6 transposes into a Pirc Defence against which I suggest the aggressive 150 Attack. I also have taken time to discuss the timid 3...d6 which is often played by aspiring players.

Conclusion

The Scotch is well suited to the kind of player who seeks a forcing type of game with ambitions of attack. I have endeavoured to provide a repertoire for White that requires low maintenance and can be learned in a weekend. The Scotch does have some heavily analysed variations and while I have mentioned them, the emphasis remains on Systems that are easy to play and will allow White to emerge frorn the opening with promising prospects."

Details
Sprache Englisch
Autor Lane, Gary
Verlag Batsford Chess
Auflage 1.
Medium Buch
Gewicht 300 g
Breite 15,5 cm
Höhe 23,2 cm
Seiten 168
ISBN-10 0713489405
ISBN-13 9780713489408
Erscheinungsjahr 2005
Einband kartoniert
Inhalte

005 Introduction

0 09 Mieses Variation: 8...Nb6

0 24 Mieses Variation: 8...Ba6 9.b3

037 Scotch Four Knights

065 Kasparov Variation 4. ..Bc5 5.Nxc6

0 81 Classical Variation : 4. ..Bc5 5.Be3

103 Classical Variation : 4. ..Bc5 5.Nb3

12 0 Steinitz Variation: 4...Qh4

1 42 Other Black Defences

1 65 Index of Variations

168 Index of Games

In the 1990 World Championship match Gary Kasparov shocked the chess world with his adoption of the unusual Scotch Opening, which had for many years been considered a poor relation for the Ruy Lopez. However, in that match and subsequently Kasparov has introduced a variety of exciting new tactical ideas which have completely transformed the reputation of the Scotch into a powerful winning weapon and it is now highly fashionable at both grandmaster, tournament and club level... Young English International Master Gary Lane deals with every important variation, with an emphasis on currently fashionable systems of attack and defence.

Fernschach

The Scotch Game Explained

EUR

19.4