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The Schliemann Defense - Volume 1

Tartakower Variation 5...Nf6

125 Seiten, kartoniert, Chess Enterprises, 1993.

10,95 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

Dieser Artikel ist sowohl bei uns als auch beim Verlag bzw. Hersteller ausverkauft. Wir können ihn daher auch nicht mehr bestellen.

When these two authors undertook to revise their 1983 treatment of the Schliemann Defense, they found that the opening had enjoyed such exercise in tournament (including Candidate Match) and correspondence play, that it would require four volumes to contain the current theory in adequate depth. This first volume treats the lines after 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 f5 4 Nc3 fxe4 5 Nxe4 Nf6, known as the Tartakower Variation. The line is extensively analyzed through example games, deeply annotated. This variation is currently the most analyzed and played line, and offers significant opportunity for creativity by both players. What's in a name?

The Schliemann Defense or Jaenisch Gambit is characterized by the moves 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5. It was the subject of considerable analytical work even before it made its tournament debut in the London tournament of 1853. The Russian theoretician Karl Jaenisch wrote a series of articles in Howard Staunton's Chronicle. The opening was proposed as a puzzle. The test was to find its refutation. Players of the White pieces are still working on it!

The little-known Dr. Adolph Schliemann contributed much to the theory of the opening in a series of articles published in the 1860s. These would hardly have been sufficient to merit the naming of the opening after him, but fate intervened in the form of an East vs. West rivalry. The West, in particular English speaking countries, chose the name Schliemann Defense and the East and non-English speaking countries chose the Jaenisch Gambit. Now that the cold war has ended, even the East has adopted the term Schliemann Defense, as reflected in recent books by the East German player Hagen Tiemann and the Russian theoretician Mikhail Tseitlin. So the authors will join the bandwagon and adopt the Schliemann Defense as the official title, while occasionally using the term Jaenisch Gambit in the text.

What's the point of 3...f5?

This is a very aggressive opening. Black takes immediate action in the center, disrupting the usually calm development of the Spanish Game. It has been known for over a century that there is no point taking the pawn (hence the classification of the opening as a gambit is a bit misleading), since it will be impossible to hold on to the weak f5-square and Black will be able to gain time with e5-e4, a theme which is seen in many games even without e4xf5.

At present, the only moves which give Black any problems at all are 4.Nc3 and 4.d4. In the former case Black temporarily allows White to dominate the center after 4...fxe4 5.Nxe4, which is the subject of the first two volumes of our survey. There are then two reasonable strategies for Black. For many years Black adopted a plan involving a counterstrike in the center with 5...d5, leading to massive complications. Just as that variation seemed to be refuted once and for all, it re-emerged in an important game in the 1989 candidates' matches and is once again the subject of considerable attention. The authors present a thorough analysis of that line in the second volume of the series.

The present volume contains discussion of Tartakower's move 5...Nf6, which became the main line of the opening during the 1980's and remains the most popular move. The development of the knight had been relegated to footnote status when the author's compiled the 1983 book, but there was an explosion of interest in the past decade. As has been the case throughout the history of this opening, many of the most important contributions have been made by amateur players and analysts, as well as by correspondence players. Nevertheless, despite all the attention there is still plenty of scope for originality!

Note: since Mikhail Tseitlin is the only Tseitlin who has made significant contributions to the opening, we will simply refer to him as Tseitlin.

The Tartakower Variation

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.Nc3 fxe4 5.Nxe4 Nf6

The move 5...Nf6 was suggested by Savielly Tartakower in his Hypermoderne Schachspiel. It was resurrected by the modern masters Parma, Tatai, Bronstein and V.Ivanov, among others. The Belgian correspondence master Boey introduced the key sacrificial idea of giving up the e-pawn for rapid development and the bishop pair. This motif has helped the authors improve upon several continuation that were thought to be good for White. Our ideas, introduced in the 1983 book, have been tested in the tournament arena and have proven successful. The Tartakower Variation can now be said to be the main line of the Schliemann in the 1990's.

When these two authors undertook to revise their 1983 treatment of the Schliemann Defense, they found that the opening had enjoyed such exercise in tournament (including Candidate Match) and correspondence play, that it would require four volumes to contain the current theory in adequate depth. This first volume treats the lines after 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 f5 4 Nc3 fxe4 5 Nxe4 Nf6, known as the Tartakower Variation. The line is extensively analyzed through example games, deeply annotated. This variation is currently the most analyzed and played line, and offers significant opportunity for creativity by both players. What's in a name?

The Schliemann Defense or Jaenisch Gambit is characterized by the moves 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5. It was the subject of considerable analytical work even before it made its tournament debut in the London tournament of 1853. The Russian theoretician Karl Jaenisch wrote a series of articles in Howard Staunton's Chronicle. The opening was proposed as a puzzle. The test was to find its refutation. Players of the White pieces are still working on it!

The little-known Dr. Adolph Schliemann contributed much to the theory of the opening in a series of articles published in the 1860s. These would hardly have been sufficient to merit the naming of the opening after him, but fate intervened in the form of an East vs. West rivalry. The West, in particular English speaking countries, chose the name Schliemann Defense and the East and non-English speaking countries chose the Jaenisch Gambit. Now that the cold war has ended, even the East has adopted the term Schliemann Defense, as reflected in recent books by the East German player Hagen Tiemann and the Russian theoretician Mikhail Tseitlin. So the authors will join the bandwagon and adopt the Schliemann Defense as the official title, while occasionally using the term Jaenisch Gambit in the text.

What's the point of 3...f5?

This is a very aggressive opening. Black takes immediate action in the center, disrupting the usually calm development of the Spanish Game. It has been known for over a century that there is no point taking the pawn (hence the classification of the opening as a gambit is a bit misleading), since it will be impossible to hold on to the weak f5-square and Black will be able to gain time with e5-e4, a theme which is seen in many games even without e4xf5.

At present, the only moves which give Black any problems at all are 4.Nc3 and 4.d4. In the former case Black temporarily allows White to dominate the center after 4...fxe4 5.Nxe4, which is the subject of the first two volumes of our survey. There are then two reasonable strategies for Black. For many years Black adopted a plan involving a counterstrike in the center with 5...d5, leading to massive complications. Just as that variation seemed to be refuted once and for all, it re-emerged in an important game in the 1989 candidates' matches and is once again the subject of considerable attention. The authors present a thorough analysis of that line in the second volume of the series.

The present volume contains discussion of Tartakower's move 5...Nf6, which became the main line of the opening during the 1980's and remains the most popular move. The development of the knight had been relegated to footnote status when the author's compiled the 1983 book, but there was an explosion of interest in the past decade. As has been the case throughout the history of this opening, many of the most important contributions have been made by amateur players and analysts, as well as by correspondence players. Nevertheless, despite all the attention there is still plenty of scope for originality!

Note: since Mikhail Tseitlin is the only Tseitlin who has made significant contributions to the opening, we will simply refer to him as Tseitlin.

The Tartakower Variation

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.Nc3 fxe4 5.Nxe4 Nf6

The move 5...Nf6 was suggested by Savielly Tartakower in his Hypermoderne Schachspiel. It was resurrected by the modern masters Parma, Tatai, Bronstein and V.Ivanov, among others. The Belgian correspondence master Boey introduced the key sacrificial idea of giving up the e-pawn for rapid development and the bishop pair. This motif has helped the authors improve upon several continuation that were thought to be good for White. Our ideas, introduced in the 1983 book, have been tested in the tournament arena and have proven successful. The Tartakower Variation can now be said to be the main line of the Schliemann in the 1990's.

Details
Sprache Englisch
Autor Schamkowitsch, Leonid
Schiller, Eric
Verlag Chess Enterprises
Medium Buch
Gewicht 180 g
Breite 13,6 cm
Höhe 21,5 cm
Seiten 125
ISBN-10 0945470320
Erscheinungsjahr 1993
Einband kartoniert
Inhalte

004 Preface

009 Introduction

012 Chapter 1: 6.Qe2 d5 7.Nxf6+ gxf6

036 Chapter 2: 6.Qe2 d5 and the knight retreats

044 Chapter 3: Black plays 6...Qe7?!

055 Chapter 4: 6.Nxf6+ Qxf6

091 Chapter 5: The 7.Qe2 Be? 8.0-0 Nd4 variation

112 Chapter 6: 6.Nxf6+ gxf6?

116 Chapter 7: White chickens out with 6.d3

120 Chapter 8: White retreats with 6.Ng3

123 Index of Games

The Schliemann Defense - Volume 1

EUR

10.95