Tel: (02501) 9288 320

Wir beraten Sie gern!

Wir sind für Sie da

Montag bis Samstag geöffnet

Versandkostenfrei

Innerhalb Deutschlands ab 50 €

Warenkorb
Warenkorb
Ihr Warenkorb ist leer.

Sie haben keine Artikel im Warenkorb.

Zwischensumme
0,00 €

Willkommen in unserem neu gestalteten Online-Shop! Haben Sie Anmerkungen, Fragen oder technische Schwierigkeiten? Schreiben Sie uns gern an info@schachversand.de.

Zur bisherigen Oberfläche geht es hier entlang.

Art.-Nr.: LXMARSOCD
Vergriffen

Secrets of Chess Defence

160 Seiten, kartoniert, Gambit, 1. Auflage 2003.

17,95 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

Dieser Artikel ist sowohl bei uns als auch beim Verlag bzw. Hersteller ausverkauft. Wir können ihn daher auch nicht mehr bestellen.

Good defensive abilities earn players a great many half-points and full-points. The climax of the defense is the launching of a devastating counter-attack, a skill at which all the great chess champions have been adept. Of particular interest to club players is Marin's discussion of how to defend against unsound attacks, and the problem of how to parry the attack while retaining winning chances. Other topics include attack and defence in equal positions, where both sides must judge carefully how much of their resources to devote to the attack and the counter-attack. The main subject, though, is the case where the defender is fighting for his life, and must decide how to maximise his chances of survival. Marin considers psychological issues and explains the main options available to the defender: simplification, cold-blooded defence, a positional sacrifice, 'blackmailing' the attacker, or a counter-attack.

Defence is traditionally a neglected area of chess study, but it is also one of the most important, rewarding and intriguing. Good defensive abilities earn players a great many half-points and full-points. The climax of the defence is the launching of a devastating counterattack, a skill at which all the great chess champions have been adept.

Sometimes we need to defend against unsound attacks, and then the challenge is to parry the attack while retaining winning chances. In equal positions, both sides must judge carefully how much of their resources to devote to the attack and the counter-attack.

The main subject, though, is the case where the defender is fighting for his life, and must decide how to maximize his chances of survival. Marin considers psychological issues and explains the main options available to the defender, such as simplification, cold-blooded defence with the minimum of forces, or a positional sacrifice. In each case he discusses in detail the key issues in the resulting positions: how to defend difficult endings; how to assess threats realistically; and the prospects for counterplay that typically arise from a variety of material imbalances.

Throughout the book there are exercises for the reader, together with full solutions.

Mihail Marin is a strong grandmaster from Romania. He achieved his first major success in international chess by qualifying for the interzonals in 1987. He has won the Romanian Championship on three occasions and has played in eight Olympiads. For several years he was editor of the magazine Chess Extrapress.

This is the first book I have written. In earlier times, irregular typing might have betrayed the author's nervousness. Nowadays, the computer hides such factors.

I shall try to explain how the book has been written and what aims I have been following.

I have a deep admiration for such classic authors as Botvinnik and Averbakh. They had a special gift for distilling many hours of work into just a few words. Besides its aesthetic value, this way of writing had also a didactic role: the reader was shown only the tip of the iceberg and was invited to uncover the rest himself.

Why, then, did I choose a completely different approach?

The main reason was that it is not so easy to follow the footsteps of such outstanding intellectuals as those mentioned. If you are not at least as good as them you risk ending up looking like a monkey that tries to imitate a human.

At the same time, I wanted to dissociate myself from a certain modern tendency. Citing a lot of games without annotations is no longer any sign of thoroughness and time-consuming research; on the contrary, it suggests a superficial approach. With those marvellous copy and paste functions, you can easily fill 200 pages in less than a week.

By giving a considerable amount of variations and verbal comments to the vast majority of the games, I have tried to convince the reader (and, possibly, myself) about the validity of the main logical discourse of each chapter.

The thorough analytical approach uncovered a surprisingly large number of errors in the previously published comments or in the games themselves. Quite often brilliant ideas were carried out in an imperfect way. This has often led to a radical reconsideration of the chapter's initial structure and, in a few regrettable cases, to the exclusion of games which have been traditionally considered as highly instructive.

I know a strong grandmaster who is working on the second edition of a best-seller without the help of a computer. In my eyes, this is a way to ensure an original, thought-provoking book. I decided not to attempt to escape wholly from the digital world, and I took advantage of most of the facilities a computer can offer. Nevertheless, when analysing a game or a position, I would usually only turn on the analysis module once I had formed a clear, human, opinion myself.

One of the most difficult tasks has been the selection of examples. There is no such button or option as 'successful defence' in the search mask provided by ChessBase. Therefore, I had to rely mostly on the information stored on an analogue support, called memory and located somewhere behind my glasses. For the most part I have chosen games by great players from all periods of chess history. There are also a significant number of my own games. This is not a consequence of my lack of modesty; I felt that I was more able to explain phenomena of a psychological and technical nature when I had experienced them myself.

I hope you will enjoy reading this book as much as I did writing it.

Mihail Marin Bucharest, 2003, Foreword

Good defensive abilities earn players a great many half-points and full-points. The climax of the defense is the launching of a devastating counter-attack, a skill at which all the great chess champions have been adept. Of particular interest to club players is Marin's discussion of how to defend against unsound attacks, and the problem of how to parry the attack while retaining winning chances. Other topics include attack and defence in equal positions, where both sides must judge carefully how much of their resources to devote to the attack and the counter-attack. The main subject, though, is the case where the defender is fighting for his life, and must decide how to maximise his chances of survival. Marin considers psychological issues and explains the main options available to the defender: simplification, cold-blooded defence, a positional sacrifice, 'blackmailing' the attacker, or a counter-attack.

Defence is traditionally a neglected area of chess study, but it is also one of the most important, rewarding and intriguing. Good defensive abilities earn players a great many half-points and full-points. The climax of the defence is the launching of a devastating counterattack, a skill at which all the great chess champions have been adept.

Sometimes we need to defend against unsound attacks, and then the challenge is to parry the attack while retaining winning chances. In equal positions, both sides must judge carefully how much of their resources to devote to the attack and the counter-attack.

The main subject, though, is the case where the defender is fighting for his life, and must decide how to maximize his chances of survival. Marin considers psychological issues and explains the main options available to the defender, such as simplification, cold-blooded defence with the minimum of forces, or a positional sacrifice. In each case he discusses in detail the key issues in the resulting positions: how to defend difficult endings; how to assess threats realistically; and the prospects for counterplay that typically arise from a variety of material imbalances.

Throughout the book there are exercises for the reader, together with full solutions.

Mihail Marin is a strong grandmaster from Romania. He achieved his first major success in international chess by qualifying for the interzonals in 1987. He has won the Romanian Championship on three occasions and has played in eight Olympiads. For several years he was editor of the magazine Chess Extrapress.

This is the first book I have written. In earlier times, irregular typing might have betrayed the author's nervousness. Nowadays, the computer hides such factors.

I shall try to explain how the book has been written and what aims I have been following.

I have a deep admiration for such classic authors as Botvinnik and Averbakh. They had a special gift for distilling many hours of work into just a few words. Besides its aesthetic value, this way of writing had also a didactic role: the reader was shown only the tip of the iceberg and was invited to uncover the rest himself.

Why, then, did I choose a completely different approach?

The main reason was that it is not so easy to follow the footsteps of such outstanding intellectuals as those mentioned. If you are not at least as good as them you risk ending up looking like a monkey that tries to imitate a human.

At the same time, I wanted to dissociate myself from a certain modern tendency. Citing a lot of games without annotations is no longer any sign of thoroughness and time-consuming research; on the contrary, it suggests a superficial approach. With those marvellous copy and paste functions, you can easily fill 200 pages in less than a week.

By giving a considerable amount of variations and verbal comments to the vast majority of the games, I have tried to convince the reader (and, possibly, myself) about the validity of the main logical discourse of each chapter.

The thorough analytical approach uncovered a surprisingly large number of errors in the previously published comments or in the games themselves. Quite often brilliant ideas were carried out in an imperfect way. This has often led to a radical reconsideration of the chapter's initial structure and, in a few regrettable cases, to the exclusion of games which have been traditionally considered as highly instructive.

I know a strong grandmaster who is working on the second edition of a best-seller without the help of a computer. In my eyes, this is a way to ensure an original, thought-provoking book. I decided not to attempt to escape wholly from the digital world, and I took advantage of most of the facilities a computer can offer. Nevertheless, when analysing a game or a position, I would usually only turn on the analysis module once I had formed a clear, human, opinion myself.

One of the most difficult tasks has been the selection of examples. There is no such button or option as 'successful defence' in the search mask provided by ChessBase. Therefore, I had to rely mostly on the information stored on an analogue support, called memory and located somewhere behind my glasses. For the most part I have chosen games by great players from all periods of chess history. There are also a significant number of my own games. This is not a consequence of my lack of modesty; I felt that I was more able to explain phenomena of a psychological and technical nature when I had experienced them myself.

I hope you will enjoy reading this book as much as I did writing it.

Mihail Marin Bucharest, 2003, Foreword

Details
Sprache Englisch
Autor Marin, Mihail
Verlag Gambit
Auflage 1.
Medium Buch
Gewicht 350 g
Breite 17,2 cm
Höhe 24,7 cm
Seiten 160
ISBN-10 1901983919
ISBN-13 9781901983913
Erscheinungsjahr 2003
Einband kartoniert
Inhalte

004 Symbols

005 Bibliography

006 Foreword

007 1 The Noble Art of Defence

018 2 Economy of Resources in Defence

026 3 How Real is the Threat?

034 4 The King as a Fighting Unit

050 5 Fortresses

062 6 Stalemate

068 7 Perpetual Check

075 8 The Soul of Chess

091 9 Defensive Sacrifices

093 10 Queen Sacrifices

104 11 Exchange Sacrifices

116 12 Minor-Piece Sacrifices

128 13 Two Minor Pieces for a Rook

139 14 Simplification

150 15 Defending Difficult Endings

164 16 Premature Resignation

169 Solutions to the Exercises

175 Index of Players

176 Index of Openings

Schachbücher über die Verteidigung werden signifikant seltener geschrieben als solche über den Angriff. Dieser Umstand erstaunt ein wenig, können doch mittels geeigneter defensiver Maßnahmen sowie durch evtl. mögliche Konterattacken etliche halbe und ganze Punkte im Turnierkampf gerettet werden.

GM Mihail Marin, dreifacher rumänischer Landesmeister und langjähriger Nationalspieler, hat sein Erstlingswerk als Autor diesem dankbaren Sujet gewidmet.

Anhand von 96 meist ausführlich besprochenen und analysierten Partiefragmenten bekannter Meister aus Vergangenheit und Gegenwart sowie von zusätzlichen 20 Übungsaufgaben für den Leser (mit Lösungsangaben am Ende des Buches, S. 169-174), wovon wiederum 31 Beispiele aus der Turnierpraxis des Autors stammen, erläutert Marin die hauptsächlichen Aspekte und Kampfmittel der defensiven Spielführung:

1) Im einleitenden Kapitel "Frühe Kunst der Verteidigung" beschreibt der Verfasser das Spielverständnis des Urvaters aller Defensivkünstler, Wilhelm Steinitz(S. 7-17).

2) Das Prinzip der Ökonomie der Verteidigungskräfte" geht ebenfalls auf Steinitz zurück (S. 18-25).

3) "Wie real ist die Drohung?" - will meinen, kann man dieselbe mangels Relevanz vielleicht einfach ignorieren? (S. 26-33).

4) Der König als Kampfeinheit" erinnert an die inhärente Stärke des Monarchen, der sich gelegentlich an der Verteidigung aktiv beteiligen kann (S. 34-49).

5) "Festungen" gelten als beliebte Zufluchtsstätte gegen allzu aufdringliche Angreifer und sichern einen halben Zähler, wenn sie stabil gebaut sind (S. 50-61).

6) "Patt" dient als letzte Überraschende Rettung vor dem Mattgesetzt-Werden (S. 62-67).

7) "Ewiges Schach" kann bisweilen nach vorhergehenden Opfern herbeigeführt werden (S. 68-74).

8) "Die Seele des Schachs", natürlich die Bauern (nach einem berühmten Statement Philidors), eignen sich bestens als zuverlässige Verteidiger (S. 75-90).

9)-13) ..Defensive Opfer" sollen dem

gegnerischen Angriff den Wind aus den Segeln nehmen und werden von Marin eingeteilt in Damenopfer (natürlich besonders spektakulär?), positionelle Qualitätsopfer (der größte Virtuose auf diesem Spezialgebiet war wohl Tigran Petrosjan), Leichtfigurenopfer (Spezialität von Boris Spasski) und die Hergabe von zwei Leichtfiguren für einen Turm (wie von Michail Tal des öfteren mit Erfolg praktiziert) (S. 91-138).

14) "Sinnreiche Vereinfachung" dient ebenfalls als gebräuchliche Defensiv-Ressource (S. 139-149).

15) Die Verteidigung schwieriger Endspiele" gilt als Markenzeichen einiger Weltmeister, vor allem von Michail Botwinnik (S. 150-163).

16) Abschließend warnt Marin eindringlich vor dem verfrühten Aufgeben", welchem u.a. schon solche Koryphäen wie Bent Larsen, Boris Spasski und Garry Kasparow zum Opfer gefallen sind (S. 164-168).

Marins Erstlingswerk besticht nicht nur durch die ausgezeichnete Systematik und Didaktik, sondern auch durch seine profunden Analysen und die immer wieder aufscheinenden Vergleiche zwischen führenden Meistern der Klassik und der Moderne hinsichtlich ihrer defensiven Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten. Ziemlich neu für ein Schachbuch dürften zudem die kapiteleinleitenden Bibelzitate sein. Allen Schachfreunden, denen es um die Verbesserung ihres Verteidigungspotenzials zu tun ist, kann Marins Buch vorbehaltlos und nachdrücklich zum intensiven Studium empfohlen werden. Kenntnisse der englischen Sprache kommen dabei sehr zupass.

Dr. W. Schweizer, Rochade Europa 11/2003

Vergleichende Rezension zu den Titeln:

Mihail Marin, Secrets of Chess Defence

Alfonso Romero, Creative Chess Strategy

Viiacheslav Eingorn, Decision-Macking at the Chessboard

Es scheint fast, als hätte der Gambit Verlag die Thematik der anspruchsvollen Mittelspielliteratur für sich monopolisiert; ich mag gar nicht mehr all die bereits an dieser Stelle besprochenen einschlägigen Vorgängerwerke aufzählen.

Alle drei Bücher sind von starken Großmeistern geschrieben und zugleich deren erste größere Werke, alle drei bieten anspruchsvolles Lehr- und Studienmaterial für den arbeitswilligen Turnierspieler ab ca. 2100 Elo. Und solche Bücher mit echtem (nicht oberflächlich-populistischem) Einblick in die Werkstatt erfahrener Großmeister lohnen sich allemal! Die Titel darf man jeweils nicht allzu wörtlich nehmen; es handelt sich durchweg um gemischtes Material, ohne starren Blick auf ein bestimmtes Thema. Die Autoren arbeiten jeweils mit eigenen Partien sowie mit Klassikern. Alle drei sind für die Zielgruppe empfehlenswert, haben aber nicht unbedingt das Zeug zum Klassiker - dazu fehlt ihnen durchweg die über das Sachliche hinausgehende literarische Klasse. Themen bei Marin sind die Ökonomie der Verteidigung, Könige im Kampfgetümmel, Wie real ist die Drohung?, Festungen (aus Studien und Partien), Patt und Dauerschach, Defensive Opfer (Dame, Qualität, sogar Figur), das Materialverhältnis Turm gegen zwei Leichtfiguren (nicht unbedingt zum Thema Verteidigung, dafür ist das Motiv in der Literatur ziemlich unterbelichtet), Vereinfachung (z. B. zu Remisendspielen mit Minusbauer), Verteidigung schlechter Endspiele.

Wie man sieht, ist das Thema "Verteidigung" recht allgemein und abstrakt gefasst, die Verteidigung gegen einen direkten Königsangriff nimmt nur einen kleinen Teil des Raumes ein. Marins Ansatz ist mehr analytisch, wer z. B. einfache Rezepte sucht, wie man sich gegen einen drohenden Königsangriff aufzustellen hat, ist hier fehl am Platze. Auch das psychologische Moment kommt ein wenig kurz. Also bestimmt nicht das Buch zur Verteidigung, sondern "einfach" Übungsmaterial aus Großmeisterhand. Romero und Eingorn beginnen beide seltsamerweise mit der Partie Petrosjan-Bannik, UdSSR-Meisterschaft 1958. Wie verschieden die Gesichtspunkte starker Großmeister sein können, zeigt das 17. Zugpaar, in dem Eingorn Fehler beider Seiten sieht, über das Romero jedoch unkommentiert hinweggeht - das soll freilich keine Wertung sein. Themen in Romeros Buch sind u. a. Bauernstruktur, Raumvorteil, starkes Zentrum, Läuferpaar, isolierter Damenbauer (mit 38 Seiten das längste Kapitel), Qualitätsopfer usw. In vielen Kapiteln gibt es nur ein oder zwei Partiebeispiele, diese werden dann jedoch tiefgründig untersucht. Die Kehrseite der Medaille ist, dass die Vielfalt der Formen der beschriebenen Themen auf der Strecke bleibt. Die im Titel genannten Schlagworte Kreativität und Phantasie sucht man im Inhalt eher vergebens - auch bei Romero verlangt die Vorteilsverwertung vor allem Geduld und Präzision. Nach einigem Schwanken gefällt mir Eingorns Buch innerhalb dieses Trios am besten. Er übertreibt es nicht mit der Analyse, arbeitet stattdessen die Schlüsselpunkte heraus, an denen Großmeister die Weichen stellen (und zwar oftmals auch falsch). Die konkreten Inhalte sind nicht leicht mit Worten zusammenzufassen, seine Kapitelthemen sind Verwicklungen, aktive Verteidigung minimal schlechterer Stellungen, Gefühl für Gefahren, inkorrektes Spiel, übersichtliche Stellungen, Inkonsequenz. Insgesamt lernt man bei Romero wohl mehr über den tiefen Gehalt typischer Stellungen, während das Studium von Eingorns Buch das Gespür für den Verlauf des Kampfes und dessen Wendepunkte schulen sollte.

Harald Keilhack, Schach 01/2004

Der bekannte Großmeister aus Rumänien beschäftigt sich in seinem Buch über pragmatische und psychologische Aspekte der Verteidigung im Schach. Die Thematik wurde auf der Basis vieler Partien und Übungen vorgestellt.

Jerzy Konikowski, Fernschach International 2004/01 Auch der rumänische Großmeister Mihail Marin ist schon lange aktiv (u. a. drei Siege bei Landesmeisterschaften und acht Olympiateilnahmen). Nachdem der 39-Jährige mehrere Jahre in seiner Heimat die Zeitschrift "Chess Extrapress" betreute und zwei vielgepriesene Eröffnungs-CDs bei ChessBase vorlegte, ist ihm mit seinem Bucherstling nun ebenfalls ein überdurchschnittliches Werk gelungen. Der Gegenstand seiner mit reichlich schachphilosophischen Betrachtungen unterfütterten Untersuchung ist das komplexe Thema der Verteidigung. Mit einem ausgewogen Mix aus klassischen, zeitgenössischen und eigenen Partien und Stellungen erläutert er die Entwicklung von Prinzipien, nach denen jeder Schachanhänger mehr oder weniger häufig fahndet. Den König als starke Figur einsetzen, eine Festung aufbauen, Pattressourcen erwägen, Dauerschach finden. Damen- und Qualitätsopfer bringen, zwei Leichtfiguren gegen Turm tauschen als konkrete Leitmotive; was ist eine Bedrohung, was bringt eine Vereinfachung, warum gab es eine zu frühe Aufgabe, wie verhält sich die Gleichgewichtsökonomie verschiedener Figurenpaare als allgemeine Maximen.

Marin bietet aber mehr als das üblich Aufgabe-Lösung-Schema: Unter Einbeziehung vor allem des Gedankenguts von Wilhelm Steinitz und in der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Kanon russischsprachiger Literatur, aber auch mit John Watson, einem der wichtigsten Theoretiker dieser Tage, beleuchtet er Ursachen für gespielte oder verpasste Zugfolgen und wie diese mit bestimmten Einstellungen und Stilfragen zusammenhängen - psychologische Zusammenhänge und Abgleiche mit Computerresultaten oftmals beigefügt. Kurzum: Eines der fesselndsten Bücher zu einem zu Unrecht vernachlässigten Thema und Material für viele, lange Trainingsabende - oder einfach nur zur Erbauung über die unerschöpfliche "Seele" des Schachs.

Harald Fietz , Schachmagazin 11/2004

Secrets of Chess Defence

EUR

17.95