Tel: (02501) 9288 320

Wir beraten Sie gern!

Wir sind für Sie da

Montag bis Samstag geöffnet

Versandkostenfrei

Innerhalb Deutschlands ab 50 €

Warenkorb
Warenkorb
Ihr Warenkorb ist leer.

Sie haben keine Artikel im Warenkorb.

Zwischensumme
0,00 €

Willkommen in unserem neu gestalteten Online-Shop! Haben Sie Anmerkungen, Fragen oder technische Schwierigkeiten? Schreiben Sie uns gern an info@schachversand.de.

Zur bisherigen Oberfläche geht es hier entlang.

Art.-Nr.: LXMARSOCT
Vergriffen

Secrets of Chess Transformations

192 Seiten, kartoniert, Gambit, 2004.

12,85 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

Dieser Artikel ist sowohl bei uns als auch beim Verlag bzw. Hersteller ausverkauft. Wir können ihn daher auch nicht mehr bestellen.

One of the most important skills in chess is the ability to transform one type of advantage into another. The great champions can effortlessly convert an initiative into an attack, an attack into a material gain, and move into an endgame where the material advantage can be exploited smoothly.

From our own games, we know that this is not as simple as it looks. We can easily miss the right moment to make the transformation, and so create unnecessary difficulties for ourselves.

In this wide-ranging text, experienced trainer Drazen Marovic discusses all aspects of chess transformations, enabling us to sense when they are necessary, and to decide how to bring them about. This understanding will also help us to frustrate our opponents' plans, and put up a resilient defence in difficult positions.

Topics include:

  • Pseudo-Sacrifices
  • Sacrificial Risks
  • Real Sacrifices
  • Counter-Sacrifices
  • Development Advantage
  • Overextension
  • Simplification

Drazen Marovic is a grandmaster from Croatia, who has won medals as both player and trainer for various national teams. His pupils include Bojan Kurajica, World Under-20 Champion in 1965, and Al Modiahki of Qatar, the first Arabian grandmaster. Marovic has a wealth of experience as a writer, editor and television commentator on chess. He was the trainer of the Croatian national team during a period in the 1990s when it achieved a number of successes in top-level contests. This is his fourth book for Gambit. His previous books discussed various aspects of pawn play and positional chess, and have been warmly received by the chess-playing public.

Introduction

In writing this book, my intention was to throw more light on the essence of the game of chess, its never-ending changing of values, the unceasing metamorphosis of the three elements it consists of - material, space and time.

We speak of pawns and pieces as material, space is outlined by the chess-board and time is manifested as a lead in development and initiative. I wanted to round off what I wrote in my earlier books published by Gambit. Understanding Pawn Play in Chess discussed elementary pawn-structures, Dynamic Pawn Play in Chess dealt with the centre and its subtle relation with pawn-formations, while Secrets of Positional Chess focused on the strength and weakness of pieces and space. Analysing these fundamental elements which make up the game of chess helped us to sharpen our awareness of those "deep connections between the quality of chess space, the pieces acting in it, and time, which binds the board and chessmen into one inseparable whole". This book examines their interrelations, the constant change to which they are subject, and their constant transformations.

Although pawns and pieces by their very existence remind us continuously of their face value, their only real value stems from what they can actually do on the chess-board. We can speak of their statistical or nominal value, but only in action, in a very concrete position, a very concrete relation of pieces and very concrete space, do pieces acquire their real values.

Their essential property is their unceasing changeability. Here I must remind you of the fact that material is a potential energy of chess. When sacrificed, it either wins material or it generates an initiative, leading to various forms of superiority. The same relations of instability govern the initiative and space advantage. Depending on one another, they grow and weaken, drawing strength from one another. Seizing space and developing an initiative often go hand in hand. The conquered territory strengthens the power exerted by the units in action. The pieces are more powerful when they have more space in which to manoeuvre and their active possibilities multiply until a new metamorphosis occurs, when the initiative either wins outright or is transformed back into material or some other type of superiority. The cycle of transformations ends only when one of the fundamental elements acquires an overwhelming superiority. Practically, metamorphoses end when the game ends.

We shall devote our attention to these themes in a series of relevant positions. As usual in my texts, a wide selection of games, covering more than a century, follows my own experience in teaching chess. Lecturing on various subjects to various age groups in different countries, I taught others, but I also learnt. As far as the selection of material goes, I learnt one thing in particular: different generations perceive a selection of games from their own angle. What is dull and worn out for older generations is often a revelation for young people and vice versa: armed with numerous magazines, computer screens, Informators and kindred literature they often find the games played in our time to be overpublicized. Naturally, a couple of overfamiliar games in dozens is very likely, whatever an author's choice might be - unless one is ready to limit the selection to second-rate examples never published before, which I am not. Besides, the thing that matters is not the age of an illustrative example, but whether it fits the subject and corroborates an opinion, especially if the context is new or the angle of observation changed (even slightly). What also matters is the clarity of such examples. Unfortunately, the mania of rapid tournaments, followed by the progressive reduction of time allotted for the game, takes its toll on the quality of modern competitions. Unless we are discussing hectically and thoroughly explored opening paths, there is less and less to choose from; relevant games for many subjects of general theory are becoming more and more scarce.

Supported by a number of opportunists or short-sighted youngsters in the ranks of professional players, who are ready to cut the branch on which they themselves are sitting for some temporary comforts or unfounded ambitions, our wise leadership say that shortening the time-limit is the best way to win our place on the almighty TV screens. They forget that the fascination with the game is still alive after many centuries not because players used to play blitz, but owing to the high-quality games of classical chess and particularly to the world championship cycle they have been destroying with the zeal which only crass ignorance and poor, provincial mentality can nourish. They are trying to convince us that playing rapidly and using hands more than the brain really matters and makes chess competitive in the big family of sports. However, there is a little problem the wise gentlemen have never thought about. If we ever get the 'desired' place (which, by the way, is a foolish hope indeed!), due to the gradual but obvious decline in the quality of modern rapid competitions, continuing in this direction in a not so distant future we shall have nothing to show to the TV public, no magazines will be worth editing and no books worth publishing. Today we are still fortunate; we can still enjoy the old and the new and we should not miss the chance, even if a couple of examples happen to be well-known and perhaps somewhat irritating. That said, I leave the reader to a selected experience of long, rich decades.

One of the most important skills in chess is the ability to transform one type of advantage into another. The great champions can effortlessly convert an initiative into an attack, an attack into a material gain, and move into an endgame where the material advantage can be exploited smoothly.

From our own games, we know that this is not as simple as it looks. We can easily miss the right moment to make the transformation, and so create unnecessary difficulties for ourselves.

In this wide-ranging text, experienced trainer Drazen Marovic discusses all aspects of chess transformations, enabling us to sense when they are necessary, and to decide how to bring them about. This understanding will also help us to frustrate our opponents' plans, and put up a resilient defence in difficult positions.

Topics include:

  • Pseudo-Sacrifices
  • Sacrificial Risks
  • Real Sacrifices
  • Counter-Sacrifices
  • Development Advantage
  • Overextension
  • Simplification

Drazen Marovic is a grandmaster from Croatia, who has won medals as both player and trainer for various national teams. His pupils include Bojan Kurajica, World Under-20 Champion in 1965, and Al Modiahki of Qatar, the first Arabian grandmaster. Marovic has a wealth of experience as a writer, editor and television commentator on chess. He was the trainer of the Croatian national team during a period in the 1990s when it achieved a number of successes in top-level contests. This is his fourth book for Gambit. His previous books discussed various aspects of pawn play and positional chess, and have been warmly received by the chess-playing public.

Introduction

In writing this book, my intention was to throw more light on the essence of the game of chess, its never-ending changing of values, the unceasing metamorphosis of the three elements it consists of - material, space and time.

We speak of pawns and pieces as material, space is outlined by the chess-board and time is manifested as a lead in development and initiative. I wanted to round off what I wrote in my earlier books published by Gambit. Understanding Pawn Play in Chess discussed elementary pawn-structures, Dynamic Pawn Play in Chess dealt with the centre and its subtle relation with pawn-formations, while Secrets of Positional Chess focused on the strength and weakness of pieces and space. Analysing these fundamental elements which make up the game of chess helped us to sharpen our awareness of those "deep connections between the quality of chess space, the pieces acting in it, and time, which binds the board and chessmen into one inseparable whole". This book examines their interrelations, the constant change to which they are subject, and their constant transformations.

Although pawns and pieces by their very existence remind us continuously of their face value, their only real value stems from what they can actually do on the chess-board. We can speak of their statistical or nominal value, but only in action, in a very concrete position, a very concrete relation of pieces and very concrete space, do pieces acquire their real values.

Their essential property is their unceasing changeability. Here I must remind you of the fact that material is a potential energy of chess. When sacrificed, it either wins material or it generates an initiative, leading to various forms of superiority. The same relations of instability govern the initiative and space advantage. Depending on one another, they grow and weaken, drawing strength from one another. Seizing space and developing an initiative often go hand in hand. The conquered territory strengthens the power exerted by the units in action. The pieces are more powerful when they have more space in which to manoeuvre and their active possibilities multiply until a new metamorphosis occurs, when the initiative either wins outright or is transformed back into material or some other type of superiority. The cycle of transformations ends only when one of the fundamental elements acquires an overwhelming superiority. Practically, metamorphoses end when the game ends.

We shall devote our attention to these themes in a series of relevant positions. As usual in my texts, a wide selection of games, covering more than a century, follows my own experience in teaching chess. Lecturing on various subjects to various age groups in different countries, I taught others, but I also learnt. As far as the selection of material goes, I learnt one thing in particular: different generations perceive a selection of games from their own angle. What is dull and worn out for older generations is often a revelation for young people and vice versa: armed with numerous magazines, computer screens, Informators and kindred literature they often find the games played in our time to be overpublicized. Naturally, a couple of overfamiliar games in dozens is very likely, whatever an author's choice might be - unless one is ready to limit the selection to second-rate examples never published before, which I am not. Besides, the thing that matters is not the age of an illustrative example, but whether it fits the subject and corroborates an opinion, especially if the context is new or the angle of observation changed (even slightly). What also matters is the clarity of such examples. Unfortunately, the mania of rapid tournaments, followed by the progressive reduction of time allotted for the game, takes its toll on the quality of modern competitions. Unless we are discussing hectically and thoroughly explored opening paths, there is less and less to choose from; relevant games for many subjects of general theory are becoming more and more scarce.

Supported by a number of opportunists or short-sighted youngsters in the ranks of professional players, who are ready to cut the branch on which they themselves are sitting for some temporary comforts or unfounded ambitions, our wise leadership say that shortening the time-limit is the best way to win our place on the almighty TV screens. They forget that the fascination with the game is still alive after many centuries not because players used to play blitz, but owing to the high-quality games of classical chess and particularly to the world championship cycle they have been destroying with the zeal which only crass ignorance and poor, provincial mentality can nourish. They are trying to convince us that playing rapidly and using hands more than the brain really matters and makes chess competitive in the big family of sports. However, there is a little problem the wise gentlemen have never thought about. If we ever get the 'desired' place (which, by the way, is a foolish hope indeed!), due to the gradual but obvious decline in the quality of modern rapid competitions, continuing in this direction in a not so distant future we shall have nothing to show to the TV public, no magazines will be worth editing and no books worth publishing. Today we are still fortunate; we can still enjoy the old and the new and we should not miss the chance, even if a couple of examples happen to be well-known and perhaps somewhat irritating. That said, I leave the reader to a selected experience of long, rich decades.

Details
Sprache Englisch
Autor Marovic, Drazen
Verlag Gambit
Medium Buch
Gewicht 400 g
Breite 17,1 cm
Höhe 24,7 cm
Seiten 192
ISBN-10 190460014X
ISBN-13 9781904600145
Erscheinungsjahr 2004
Einband kartoniert
Inhalte

004 Symbols

005 Introduction

Part 1: Material and Time

007 1 Material and Time: Introduction

010 2 Pseudo-Sacrifices

030 3 Sacrificial Risks: Zwischenzug

036 4 Sacrificial Risks: Counter-Sacrifice

043 5 Sacrificial Risks: Simplification

061 6 Real Sacrifices

130 7 Lead in Development

Part 2: Space and Time

142 8 Space and Time

197 9 Overextension

206 Index of Players

208 Index of Composers

In every game of chess there are three basic elements that come into play - time, space and material. Throughout the game there is a constant interplay between the three elements as the position on the board changes with every move played. These changes (transformations), and how to bring them about in practice at the board to our advantage, form the subject matter of this excellent book.

Part One, Material and Time, consists of seven chapters in which the themes of sacrifice (real and pseudo), counter-sacrifice, zwischenzug and lead in development are examined. Part Two,Space and Time, is shorter (only two chapters) and examines how a spatial advantage can be transformed into a winning one.

Knowing how to transform one type of advantage into another is of vital importance, and is something which distinguishes between the really strong player and us lesser mortals. For this reason most of the examples studied in the book feature the games of top GMs, a large percentage being the games of World Champions from Steinitz onwards.

This is not a book for beginners or weaker players, nor is it suitable for light bedtime reading. It demands hard work and concentration on the part of the reader, but could be studied profitably by strong club players who want to become even stronger. The positions are well chosen, and the subsequent play clearly explained, with the author sticking to the point and not straying off into long sub-variations. I found that it gave a fascinating insight into how a world class player views the board, and it has given me much food for thought.

Alan Sutton, "En Passant"

Der kroatische GM Drazen Marovic trainierte in den 1990er-Jahren das Nationalteam seines Heimatlandes, fungierte als TV-Kommentator für Schach und gilt schon lange als versierter Autor, u.a. über die Themen Positionsspiel und Kunst der Bauernführung.

Sein neuestes Werk befasst sich mit den schachlichen Grundelementen Material, Raum und Zeit und erklärt anhand zahlreicher Bespiele aus der Meisterpraxis von 1870 bis heute (wahrhaft ein weit gespannter Bogen!) sowie einiger Perlen der Studienkunst die Möglichkeiten, wie die genannten Bausteine während des Partieverlaufs vorteilhaft ineinander umgewandelt werden können.

Im ersten Teil behandelt der Autor die Transformation von Material und Zeit:

1) Allgemeine Einführung (S. 7-9);

2) Pseudo-Opfer (S. 10-29): eine Seite opfert Material, um es kurz darauf mit "Zins und Zinseszins" wieder zurückzuerobern (42 Beispiele); Risiken bei einem solchen Vorgehen können sich ergeben durch:

3) Die gefürchteten Zwischenzüge, welche die Planung gehörig durcheinander bringen können (S. 30-35, zehn Beispiele);

4) Gegenopfer werden in der Vorausberechnung gerne übersehen (S. 36-42 mit 9 Beispielen);

5) Schließlich kann der Gegner eventuell auf Vereinfachung spielen und den Sinn des Opfers konterkarieren (S. 43-60, mit 21 Beispielen).

6) Die "echten" Opfer zur Umwandlung von Material und Zeit (= Initiative, Angriff) betrachtet der Autor in diesem unfangreichen Kapitel in aufsteigender Reihenfolge: beginnend mit positionellen Bauernopfern über Qualitäts- und Leichtfigurenopfer spannt er einen weiten Bogen bis hin zur Preisgabe von Turm und Dame (S. 61-129, mit nicht weniger als 91 Partiefragmenten und drei vollständigen Partien zur Veranschaulichung);

7) Die Ausbeutung eines Entwicklungsvorsprunges beschreibt Marovic anhand von 15 Beispielen (S. 130-141). Der zweite Hauptabschnitt ist dem Thema Raum und Zeit gewidmet:

8) Die Umwandlung eines Raumvorteils in Initiative kann nur dann gelingen, wenn das Hinterland genügend gesichert erscheint. Hier bespricht der Verfasser neben königsindischen Strukturen (weiße Bauern auf c4, d5 und e4 gegen schwarze Bauern auf c5, d6 und e5) und solchen mit einem weißen Vorpostenbauern auf e5 auch die Maroczy-Formation im Sizilianer, sowie das große Zentrum mit weißen Bauern auf e4 und d4 (S. 142-196, mit 60 Partiefragmenten und 17 Endspiel-Studien).

9) Eine "Überdehnung" der Position kann entstehen, wenn der über Raumvorteil gebietende Spieler seine vorgeprellten Bauern nicht rechtzeitig gesichert hat, so dass der Gegner erfolgreich Lücken in das vermeintliche Bollwerk schlagen und einen wirkungsvollen Gegenangriff inszenieren kann, welcher den ursprünglichen Bauernvorteil total entwertet (S. 197-205, mit 12 Beispielen).

Mit Hilfe guter allgemeiner Erläuterungen und insgesamt 280 sorgsam ausgewählter Beispiele gelingt es dem überaus versierten und erfahrenen Autor, dem Leser die Implikationen der verschiedenen Transformationen von Material, Raum und Zeit umfassend zu erklären. Englische Sprachkenntnisse erweisen sich jedoch bei der Lektüre des Textes als äußerst hilfreich...

Dr. W. Schweizer - Rochade Europa Nr. 10 Oktober 2004

_____________________________________________________

Panta rhei - "alles fließt". Dem griechischen Philosophen Heraklit wird das Wort zugeschrieben. Es bringt seine Lehre auf den Punkt, wonach nichts bleibt wie es ist: alles wandelt sich unaufhörlich. Das gilt auch für jede Schachpartie, meint Autor GM Drazen Marovic im vorliegenden Buch. Tiefe strategische Beziehungen bestehen zwischen den Qualitäten Material, Raum und Zeit , auch sie wandeln sind im steten Fluss des Spiels. Wer das verstanden hat, kann den Lauf der Dinge durch kluge Transformationen zu seinem Vorteil lenken. Es ist Marovics viertes Buch für den Verlag Gambit, und sein anspruchsvollstes. Er gliedert das Thema in zwei große Teile:

Part 1: Material and Time

Part 2: Space and Time

Im ersten Teil geht es vor allem um Materielles: Der kluge Spieler hängt nicht verbissen an seinen Klötzchen, im rechten Moment tauscht Material gegen Raum oder Zeit. Bevor echte Opfer behandelt werden, zeigt Marovic rund 40 Scheinopfer ("Pseudo-Sacrifices"; 20 S.). Anschließend wird der Leser über drei Risiken beim richtigen Opfern aufgeklärt: den Zwischenzug, das Gegenopfer und die Vereinfachung. Zum Teil sind es taktische Themen, aber wer opfert, sollte die Gefahren möglichst vorher (er-) kennen. Auch dazu zeigt Marovic reichlich Partiefragmente aus den letzten 120 Jahren. Inzwischen sind wir auf Seite 61 angekommen, jetzt geht es los mit den "Real sacrifices". Das Kapitel ist mit 70 Seiten das größte im Buch. Immer sind es strategische Opfer, beginnend mit Bauern, dann folgen Qualitäts- und reine Figurenopfer. Weil Bauern und Figuren mit Händen zu greifen sind, ein paar Extra-Tempi oder möglicher Raumgewinn aber nicht, ist der Stress beträchtlich, den der Investor aushaken muss, bis "Sich das Geschäft (hoffentlich) auszahlt. Der Kroate müht sich redlich, dem Leser das Thema schmackhaft zu machen:

Viel Prominenz lässt er auffahren, oft zeigt er Ausschnitte jüngerer Partien, z. B. Kasparow - Ponomariov, Linares 2002 oder Bologan - Radjabov, Dortmund 2003. Aber das positionelle Opfern bleibt eine riskante Sache, ein Akt mehr aus der Intuition heraus als aus kühler Berechnung, so Marovics Fazit.

Hier, wie auch in den anderen Kapiteln, hätte ich mir vom Autor mehr Prinzipielles zum Thema "Transformation" gewünscht (wie der Untertitel des Buches verspricht). Die vielen Beispiele mögen noch so prägnant sein, das pädagogische Geschick eines guten Lehrers (Autors) besteht vor allem darin, dem Lernenden zu helfen, aus Beispielen auf allgemeine Prinzipien zu schließen, zugrunde liegende Muster zu erkennen und im Gedächtnis zu speichern.

[EXKURS ins Hirn des denkenden Schachspielers:

Raffinierte Technik ermöglicht es, das Gehirn von Amateuren und Meistern beim Lösen von Schachaufgaben zu beobachten. Der Unterschied ist drastisch: Das Amateur-Hirn aktiviert vorrangig jene Regionen, die für logisches Denken und Abspeichern neuen(!) Wissens zuständig sind - der Amateur rechnet sofort. Das Gehirn des Meisters lässt sich damit Zeit. Erst reduziert er die Stellung auf ihre wesentlichen Merkmale, dann stöbert er im Langzeit-Gedächtnis nach ähnlichen Mustern samt optimaler Fortsetzung, der tauglichste Plan wird aus dem Speicher geholt. Alles geschieht schnell und weitgehend unbewusst. Erst danach beginnt der GM zu rechnen. Bei solchen Tests mit Schachspielern reichte allein der Blick auf die jeweils aktiven Hirnregionen, um zu wissen, wer ein 1800er ist und wer ein GM.] Meisterliches Schach scheint also gekoppelt zu sein 1) an ein exzellentes Langzeitgedächtnis, 2) in dem unzählige Schachmuster mit den zugehörigen Verfahren gespeichert sind, und 3) alles blitzschnell abrufbar ist. Je mehr Muster, desto mehr Elo. Und je mehr Muster ein Autor oder Trainer seiner Kundschaft einzutrichtern vermag, um so besser ist er und um so begabter sind seine Schüler.

Aus einzelnen Beobachtungen allgemeine Lehren ziehen (=Induktion) ist das, was Wissenschaft ausmacht. Solche Lehren für die Schachtaktik und das Endspiel zu formulieren ist vergleichsweise einfach: dazu gibt es reichlich Literatur. Gute Lehrbücher für das Mittelspiel dagegen sind rar - jedem fällt dann Aaron Nimzowitsch ein ("Mein System"). Der kauzige Meister aus Riga verstand sich auf den Eintrichter-Job, den er mit derben Sprüchen begleitete ("der Freibauer ist ein Verbrecher ..."). Bei vielen Großmeistern gilt sein "System" noch immer als bestes Schachbuch aller Zeiten. So martialisch wie Nimzowitsch muss Drazen Marovic nicht schreiben, aber etwas mehr Lehren hätte er aus seinen fast 300 Beispielen schon ziehen und dem Leser mitgeben können. Am besten im Fettdruck, eingerahmt oder farblich unterlegt. Bei Lehrbüchern der Naturwissenschaften ist das selbstverständlich - Schachautoren und Verleger gönnen ihren Lesern nicht einmal das bisschen Didaktik.

Im Part 2 von Marovics Transformationslehre geht es um "Raum und Zeit". Raum ist für ihn das Produkt aus investierten Tempi und Figurenaktivität: Es braucht seine Zeit, um einen soliden Vorposten zu installieren oder eine Diagonale freizumachen. Raumgewinn bedeutet mehr Mobilität, die Initiative kann leichter ergriffen werden. Viele Beispiele zeigen Bauernvorstöße, oder Raum wird durch Figurenmanöver gewonnen, gelegentlich wird auch geopfert - die Themen überlappen sich also. Immer geht es um Wechselwirkungen, daher hat Raumvorteil allein noch keinen Wert. Das Kroate macht das im Schlusskapitel "Überdehnung" (over-extension) an 12 Beispielen deutlich, beginnend mit der Kurzpartie Letelier - Fischer, Olm Leipzig 1960 (1.d4 Sf6 2.c4 g6 3.Sc3 Lg7 4.e4 0-0 5. e5?! Se8 6.f4 d6 7.Le3?! c5! 8.dc5 Sc6! ... nach 23 Zg. 0:1). Mit dem Raum verhalte es sich im Schach wie im Krieg: leichter zu erobern als zu verteidigen. Dann schließt das Buch mit einem Spielerverzeichnis, die Komponisten der 18 Studien sind separat gelistet.

Fazit: Im Verlauf einer Partie sind die Qualitäten Material, Raum und Zeit im steten Fluss. Damit der Spieler nicht darin ertrinkt, sondern den Fluss zu seinem Vorteil kanalisiert, hat GM Drazen Marovic rund 270 Partieausschnitte und einige Studien zum Thema "Transformationen" zusammengestellt. Die Beispiele sind gut gewählt und klar kommentiert. Zu wünschen wären mehr Hinweise vom Autor für den Leser, wenn der allgemeine Lehren ziehen will für sein eigenes Spiel. Daher ist es weniger ein Lehrbuch, mehr ein prall gefülltes Übungsbuch. Schwere Kost mit hohem Nährwert.

Dr. Erik Rausch, Rochade Europa 12/2004

----------------------------------------------------

Das Buch besteht aus zwei Teilen: 1. Material und Zeit und 2. Raum und Zeit. Der bekannte Großmeister aus Kroatien versucht in seinem Werk mit Hilfe von vielen interessanten Beispiele die Implikationen der verschiedenen Transformationen von Material und Zeit zu erklären. Die Thematik ist sehr kompliziert. Deshalb ist das Buch für fortgeschrittene Spieler sehr zu emp­fehlen.

Fernschach International 05/2004

In every game of chess there are three basic elements that come into play - time, space and material. Throughout the game there is a constant interplay between the three elements as the position on the board changes with every move played. These changes (transformations), and how to bring them about in practice at the board to our advantage, form the subject matter of this excellent book.

Part One, Material and Time, consists of seven chapters in which the themes of sacrifice (real and pseudo), counter-sacrifice, zwischenzug and lead in development are examined. Part Two,Space and Time, is shorter (only two chapters) and examines how a spatial advantage can be transformed into a winning one.

Knowing how to transform one type of advantage into another is of vital importance, and is something which distinguishes between the really strong player and us lesser mortals. For this reason most of the examples studied in the book feature the games of top GMs, a large percentage being the games of World Champions from Steinitz onwards.

This is not a book for beginners or weaker players, nor is it suitable for light bedtime reading. It demands hard work and concentration on the part of the reader, but could be studied profitably by strong club players who want to become even stronger. The positions are well chosen, and the subsequent play clearly explained, with the author sticking to the point and not straying off into long sub-variations. I found that it gave a fascinating insight into how a world class player views the board, and it has given me much food for thought.

Alan Sutton, "En Passant"

Secrets of Chess Transformations

EUR

12.85