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Art.-Nr.: LZTCPMV021864

The Chess Player's Magazine / Vol. II. - 1864

386 Seiten, Leinen, Caissa 90-Olomouc, 2004.

30,95 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

It would be false modesty on our part to apologise, to the public at large, or to the Chess-playing world in particular, for introducing a new Chess periodical, as in doing so we only supply a deficiency which already must have been strongly felt by every English Chess player, adept, amateur, or tyro. Thus, whilst Germany can boast of its Schachzeitung, France of its La Regence, Holland of its Sissa, the Anglo-Saxon race alone, whose rule predominates on two continents, has no Chess representative of its own in the republic of letters. Neither the United States nor England have, lately, had the advantage of a Chess organ. Our transatlantic brethren, it must be confessed, have strong and valid reasons for their momentary neglect of this noble game, in the fratricidal strife which rages in their country; but we, here, on the shores of the Thames, where, as our Chancellor of the Exchequer assures us, peace and plenty reigns, have no such excuses to plead. Since the extinction of the once widely circulated Chess Player's Chronicle, which took place more than a year ago, Chess was only represented in England in a few scanty columns of weekly papers, such as the Era, the Illustrated London News, the Field, and others. It was to fill this gap which existed in the literature of Chess that we undertook the arduous, and often sterile task, of publishing a Chess Magazine. We did it after full consideration of the difficulties we shall have to encounter, and with the firm determination, if not, to command success, at least to deserve it. We have carefully pondered over the causes which led to the downfall of former Chess periodicals, and shall try to steer clear of the hidden rocks and breakers which threaten grim dangers to the editorial Chess vessel. The patronage of the lovers of Chess being the conditio sine qua nun of the success of every Chess work, we have spared no efforts to ensure it; thus, price, form, and contents, which are the three essential points, are, we hope, such as to satisfy the most dainty. Impartiality being our motto, our criticisms will never extend to persons, but only to the games or problems, and contributions, if deserving a place in our columns, will be gratefully accepted from every part. To render our periodical useful not only to the adept or amateur, but also to the tyro, we shall begin with our first number, to give elementary lessons in Chess, which will gradually bring the student to a perfect knowledge of the game. We shall also give complete analyses of openings for the more advanced amateurs-a feature very prominent in the German Schachzeitung, but until now little cultivated in the English, and altogether neglected in La Regence and other French Chess periodicals. Studies of end games will be carefully attended to and given in systematic order, so as to enable our readers to obtain a comprehensive knowledge of the whole...

The Proprietors

It would be false modesty on our part to apologise, to the public at large, or to the Chess-playing world in particular, for introducing a new Chess periodical, as in doing so we only supply a deficiency which already must have been strongly felt by every English Chess player, adept, amateur, or tyro. Thus, whilst Germany can boast of its Schachzeitung, France of its La Regence, Holland of its Sissa, the Anglo-Saxon race alone, whose rule predominates on two continents, has no Chess representative of its own in the republic of letters. Neither the United States nor England have, lately, had the advantage of a Chess organ. Our transatlantic brethren, it must be confessed, have strong and valid reasons for their momentary neglect of this noble game, in the fratricidal strife which rages in their country; but we, here, on the shores of the Thames, where, as our Chancellor of the Exchequer assures us, peace and plenty reigns, have no such excuses to plead. Since the extinction of the once widely circulated Chess Player's Chronicle, which took place more than a year ago, Chess was only represented in England in a few scanty columns of weekly papers, such as the Era, the Illustrated London News, the Field, and others. It was to fill this gap which existed in the literature of Chess that we undertook the arduous, and often sterile task, of publishing a Chess Magazine. We did it after full consideration of the difficulties we shall have to encounter, and with the firm determination, if not, to command success, at least to deserve it. We have carefully pondered over the causes which led to the downfall of former Chess periodicals, and shall try to steer clear of the hidden rocks and breakers which threaten grim dangers to the editorial Chess vessel. The patronage of the lovers of Chess being the conditio sine qua nun of the success of every Chess work, we have spared no efforts to ensure it; thus, price, form, and contents, which are the three essential points, are, we hope, such as to satisfy the most dainty. Impartiality being our motto, our criticisms will never extend to persons, but only to the games or problems, and contributions, if deserving a place in our columns, will be gratefully accepted from every part. To render our periodical useful not only to the adept or amateur, but also to the tyro, we shall begin with our first number, to give elementary lessons in Chess, which will gradually bring the student to a perfect knowledge of the game. We shall also give complete analyses of openings for the more advanced amateurs-a feature very prominent in the German Schachzeitung, but until now little cultivated in the English, and altogether neglected in La Regence and other French Chess periodicals. Studies of end games will be carefully attended to and given in systematic order, so as to enable our readers to obtain a comprehensive knowledge of the whole...

The Proprietors

Details

Sprache Englisch
Autor Healey, E.
Verlag Caissa 90-Olomouc
Medium Buch
Gewicht 660 g
Breite 15 cm
Höhe 21 cm
Seiten 386
ISBN-10 8071895024
Erscheinungsjahr 2004
Einband Leinen

The Chess Player's Magazine / Vol. II. - 1864

EUR

30.95