Währung:
Sprache:
Toggle Nav
Tel: (02501) 9288 320

Wir beraten Sie gern!

Wir sind für Sie da

Versandkostenfrei

Innerhalb Deutschlands ab 50 €

Warenkorb Warenkorb
Artikelnummer
LXBERWCCM01

World Chess Championship Matches 1 1

Steinitz, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine, Euwe

311 Seiten, gebunden, Russian Chess House, 2002

Aus der Reihe »Die Wettkämpfe für die Schachweltmeisterschaft«

19,58 €
Inkl. 5% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

This three-volume anthology contains the collected and annotated games of all the matches for the world chess championship between 1886 and 1998.

In the overwhelming majority of cases, these matches were battles between genuine chess giants. In 1947 the organization of the world championships, including qualifying competitions, was taken on by the International Chess Federation (FIDE). This strengthened both the prestige of the title itself, and also the prestige of FIDE, which competently arranged these events for half a century.

Among the games presented in this work are a number of genuine masterpieces, the study of which will afford great pleasure to lovers of the game. It can be confidently stated that this publication gives the most vivid impression of the state of chess skill and chess knowledge at various stages in the history of our game throughout the last hundred years. Such material cannot age and cannot be consigned to oblivion.

In the present rapidly changing world, it has to be considered how best to continue and develop this old tradition of determining the best chess player in the world. It so happened that, like it or not, the previous system needed to be radically revised. It had both virtues and drawbacks; in the end its drawbacks - lack of commercial appeal and difficulty in providing a worthy remuneration to the participants - played their part, forcing new paths to be adopted. This is why this three-volume anthology is both in the nature of a report on what has been done up till now, and also an expression of our deep respect and admiration for great players, who have held the title of champion since the time when it was established.

Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, Preface

STEINITZ - ZUKERTORT 12,5-7,5

U.S.A., 11.01 -29.03.1886

The very first match for the world chess championship was held in three U.S. cities: New York, St. Louis and New Orleans. No organization existed then that could have declared its right to arrange such competitions on a regular basis, but nobody disputed the legality of the title when Steinitz won it...

STEINITZ - TCHIGORIN 10,5-6,5

Havana, 20.01 -24.02.1889

Champions used then to choose opponents for themselves, but this was not a great Problem for the chess world, as public opinion was fully respected. In this match all the games except one ended in a win for one side or the other - unbelievable! Steinitz fell behind again at the Start, but later he appeared to find the key to his adversary.

STEINITZ - GINSBERG 10,5-8,5

New York, 9.12.1890 - 22.01.1891

Gunsberg won a strong tournament in New York shortly betfore the match and he also had a drawn match against Chigorin to his credit. He turned out to be a difficult Opponent for Steinitz, achieving a plus score after five games and resisting very hard till the very end.

STEINITZ - TCHIGORIN 12,5-10,5

Havana, 1.01 - 28.02.1892

Steinitz had to solve a difficult problem: whom should he play? Tarrasch claimed his rights, but in a very unpolite way, and so Steinitz, who was then 56, preferred another match against Chigorin. He was on the verge of losing this time, and so it became clear that the next match would probably give the chess world a new Champion.

LASKER - STEINITZ 12-7

U.SA - Canada, 15.03 - 26.05.1894

The fight was even only at the beginning: 3-3 after the six games in New York. After they had moved to Philadelphia, Lasker won five games in a row, and the finish in Montreal could not change anything. The unique 27-year period of Lasker's domination followed.

LASKER - STEINITZ 12,5-4,5

Moscow, 7.11.1896 - 14.01.1897

Seven losses and four draws in the first eleven games confirmed the obvious fact: Steinitz could no longer demonstrate his former strength. A 10-year break in world championship matches now followed, during which only Tarrasch was regarded a worthy Opponent for Lasker, but for some reason their duel occurred much later.

LASKER - MARSHALL 11,5-3,5

U.SA, 26.01 - 06.04.1907

After the break, the first to make an attempt to win the chess crown was Frank Marshall, the winner of the great tournament at Cambridge Springs (1904). His compatriots wanted to see him on the throne and they collected the funds required, but Lasker simply devastated his Opponent.

LASKER - TARRASCH 10,5-5,5

Germany, 17.08 - 30.09.1908

When Tarrasch finally got his chance to contest the title, his best years had already passed. He played in many tournaments after this match, but achieved no notable successes. It is hard to say who was more unfortunate - he, or, for example, Nimzowitsch or Rubinstein, who did not play a match for the title at all.

LASKER - JANOWSKI 8-2

Paris, 19.10-09.11.1909

Janowski was a brilliant player, and he played beautiful chess, with many sacrifices, l but most important - he had a wealthy patron. This fact meant a lot, and it explains why Janowski had the honor of playing two matches for the chess crown. For Lasker, however, he was not a tough enough Opponent.

L4SKER - SCHLECHTER 5-5

Vienna - Berlin, 7.01 -10.02.1910

There were many contradictions associated with this short match, and much \ discussion revolved around the question of what would have happened if Schlechter had drawn the last game. A version of the match regulations existed where it was said that, to win the title, the challenger had to achieve a score of plus 2 rather than the usual plus 1. If so, a draw in the last game was equivalent to a loss for Schlechter.

LASKER - JANOWSKI

Berlin-Paris, 8.11 -9.12.1910

Their first match seemed to have answered all possible questions, and Lasker apparently played this second match as if fighting against himself, trying to prove that a a more convincing score could be achieved. Incidentally, Lasker was reproached for playing Janowski again - there were more deserving opponents around.

CAPABLANCA - LASKER 9-5

Havana, 15.03-28.04.1921

The First World War destroyed normal chess life for many years. However, it did not affect Capablanca - the Cuban genius, the winner of many strong tournaments. He lived in the U.S.A. and had no problems. The aging Lasker, being in tight circumstances, agreed to play in Havana, and complained about it later. But, to be honest, Capa was simply stronger at that time...

ALEKHINE - CAPABIANCA 18,5-15,5

Buenos Aires, 16.09 - 29.11.1927

Everyone was sure that Capablanca would beat Alekhine, except for the challenger himself and a few of his friends: Alekhine had not won even a single game against Capa prior to the match. Their duel was extremely close, it was necessary to win six games, and a record was established for the length of this type of event. The winner was the player who was both a genius, and a hard worker.

ALEKHINE - BOGOUJBOW 15,5-9,5

Germany - the Netherlands, 6.09 - 12.11.1929

Two Russian matadors, one with a French passport, the other with a German one, travelling through Germany and Holland, playing a match for the world championship...

The contest was very interesting for its chess content: Alekhine was very much the stronger of the two, but he had to make full use of his powers in order to beat his Opponent.

ALEKHINE - BOGOLJUBOW 15,5-10,5

Germany, 1.04- 14.06.1934

Their second match was also not very interesting as regards its result, and it remained in the history of chess mainly for its games. Alekhine's domination then over his main rivals was at times simply overwhelming.

EUWE - ALEKHINE 15,5-14,5

the Netherlands, 3.10- 15.12.1935

Euwe did not expect to win this match, but hoped to offer a tough resistance and nothing more. His friends, however, had another opinion: they saw that Alekhine's play had deteriorated and that his nerves were not as strong as before. Alekhine also assisted his Opponent: first, he underestimated Euwe, and when he was losing he failed to show his best form.

ALEKHINE - EUWE 15,5-9,5

the Netherlands, 5.10-7.12.1937

The convincing revenge in this match gave rise to a joke - "Alekhine simply loaned his title to Euwe for two years". Alekhine regained the crown and held it until his death in 1946. The Second World War also contributed to this fact, and what happened thereafter was already the beginning of a new story.

In dieser Anthologie sind sämtliche Partien der Weltmeisterschaftswettkämpfe im Schach von 1896 bis 1997 in drei Bänden zusammengestellt und kommentiert.

Fast immer fanden diese Wettkämpfe zwischen wahren Giganten des Schachs statt. Seit 1947 ist der Internationale Weltschachverband FIDE für diese Ereignisse einschließlich ihrer Qualifikationswettbewerbe verantwortlich, was im Laufe eines halben Jahrhunderts wesentlich sowohl zum Ansehen des Weltmeistertitels als auch der FIDE beitrug.

Unter den Partien dieses Buches findet man zahlreiche Meisterwerke - ihr Studium ist für alle Liebhaber der Schachkunst ein Genuß. Und daneben gibt dieses Werk sicherlich eine der anschaulichsten Darstellungen über Schachkunst und Schachkenntnisse der letzten 100 Jahre. Dieser Reichtum des Schachspiels veraltet nie und sollte für immer bewahrt werden.

In der heutigen Welt, die schnellen Veränderungen unterworfen ist, sind Überlegungen nötig, wie die alte Tradition zur Ermittlung des Schachweltmeisters fortgesetzt und entwickelt werden muß. Ich denke, man sollte das alte System grundsätzlich neu überdenken und modernisieren. Zwar hatte das frühere System auch Vorteile, aber die Nachteile überwiegen: Die kommerziellen Möglichkeiten sind gering und der finanzielle Gewinn für die Spieler ist nicht leicht aufzubringen. Die Schachwelt muß deshalb neue Wege beschreiten.

Aber gerade wegen dieser Veränderungen ist die vorliegende Anthologie ein einzigartiges Dokument der Leistungen vergangener Zeiten, sie ist ein Ausdruck unserer hohen Wertschätzung und Begeisterung für große Schachspieler, welche die Schachkrone in der Geschichte der Weltmeisterschaften errangen.

Kirsan Iljumzhinow im Vorwort STEINITZ - ZUKERTORT 12,5-7,5

U.S.A., 11.01 -29.03.1886

Der erste Wettkampf um die Weltmeisterschaft im Schach wurde in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika gespielt. Zu dieser Zeit gab es noch keine Organisation, die dieses Ereignis nach einem festgelegtem Reglement durchführte - trotzdem stand die Rechtmäßigkeit des ersten Weltmeistertitels für niemanden in Frage.

STEINITZ - TCHIGORIN 10,5-6,5

Havana, 20.01 -24.02.1889

Der Weltmeister wählte seinen Herausforderer selbst aus, was nicht als Problem angesehen wurde, da seine Meinung hoch geachtet war. Die Zahl der entschiedenen Partien in diesem Wettkampf ist wunderbar! Steinitz hatte es zu Beginn wieder schwer, danach gelang es ihm jedoch, sich auch auf diesen Gegner einzustellen...

STEINITZ - GINSBERG 10,5-8,5

New York, 9.12.1890-22.01.1891

Gunsberg gewann kurz vor dem Wettkampf ein großes Turnier in New York und hatte einen unentschiedenen Wettkampf gegen Tschigorin auf seinem Konto. Er erwies sich als ein starker Gegner - Gunsberg führte nach den ersten fünf Partien und leistete Steinitz bis zuletzt harten Widerstand.

STEINITZ - TCHIGORIN 12,5-10,5

Havana, 1.01 -28.02.1892

Steinitz stand vor einem schwierigen Problem: wer sollte sein neuer Gegner werden? Tarrasch wollte antreten, aber seine Herausforderung wurde in einer so scharfen Form vorgebracht, daß der 56-jährige Steinitz nochmals Tschigorin den Vorzug gab. Der Weltmeister war sehr nahe daran, seinen Titel zu verlieren, und es wurde deutlich, daß der nächste Wettkampf wahrscheinlich einen neuen Weltmeister hervorbringen würde.

LASKER - STEINITZ 12-7

U.SA - Canada, 15.03 - 26.05.1894

Die Schlacht verlief nur in den ersten sechs Partien ausgeglichen, welche in New York gespielt wurden (3:3). In Philadelphia gewann Lasker fünf Partien nacheinander und Steinitz konnte zum Schluß in Montreal nichts mehr retten. Die 27-jährige Herrschaft von Lasker begann...

LASKER - STEINITZ 12,5-4,5

Moscow, 7.11.1896- 14.01.1897

Sieben Siege für Lasker und vier Unentschieden in den ersten 11 Partien machten offensichtlich, daß Steinitz viel von seiner einstigen Stärke verloren hatte. Es folgte eine 10-jährige Unterbrechung der Weltmeisterschaftskämpfe. Nur Tarrasch wurde als würdiger Gegner für Lasker angesehen, aber aus verschiedenen Gründen wurde dieses Duell erst viel später ausgetragen.

LASKER - MARSHALL 11,5-3,5

U.SA, 26.01 -06.04.1907

Der erste Gegner Laskers in einem Weltmeisterschaftskampf nach einer langen Unterbrechung war der Amerikaner Frank Marshall, der Sieger des großen Turniers zu Cambridge Springs. Seine Landsleute wollten ihn als neuen Weltmeister sehen und sammelten genug Geld, um den Wettkampf zu ermöglichen. Aber Lasker vernichtete seinen Gegner.

LASKER - TARRASCH 10,5-5,5

Germany, 17.08 - 30.09.1908

Als Tarrasch die Möglichkeit erhielt, um den Welttitel zu kämpfen, war seine größte Zeit bereits vergangen. Er spielte auch nach diesem Wettkampf noch viel, konnte aber keine großen Erfolge mehr erringen. Es ist schwer zu beurteilen, wer mehr Pech hatte - er oder z.B. Nimzowitsch und Rubinstein, die beide überhaupt keine Chance in einem Wettkampf bekamen.

LASKER - JANOWSKI 8-2

Paris, 19.10-09.11.1909

Janowski war ein glänzender Spieler - seine schönen Partien und zahlreichen Opfer waren beeindruckend. Sein größter Vorteil war jedoch, daß ein mächtiger Mäzen ihn unterstützte. Nur diese Tatsache allein kann erklären, warum er zweimal die Chance bekam, um die Schachkrone zu kämpfen. Für Lasker war er, wie bald klar wurde, kaum ein ernster Gegner.

LASKER - SCHLECHTER 5-5

Vienna - Berlin, 7.01 -10.02.1910

Dieser kurze Wettkampf ruft noch heute viele Diskussionen hervor: Die entscheidende Frage ist, was geschehen sollte, falls Schlechter die letzte Partie des Wettkampfes remisiert hätte. Eine Version des Wettkampfreglements lautet, daß er nicht nur einen, sondern zwei Mehrpunkte haben sollte, um den Titel zu gewinnen. Somit käme ein Unentschieden in dieser Partie für ihn einem Verlust gleich.

LASKER - JANOWSKI 9,5-1,5

Berlin-Paris, 8.11 -9.12.1910

Es scheint, daß der erste Wettkampf zwischen diesen Gegnern schon alle denkbaren Fragen beantwortet hatte. Lasker kämpfte so, als wenn er sich selbst beweisen wollte, daß eine noch größere Vernichtung des Herausforderers möglich war. Inzwischen war Lasker wegen seiner Wahl des Gegners stark kritisiert worden: er solle sich einem Spieler stellen, der ein würdigerer Gegner sei.

CAPABLANCA - LASKER 9-5

Havana, 15.03-28.04.1921

Der erste Weltkrieg unterbrach für lange Jahre das Schachleben. Aber der geniale Kubaner Capablanca, der viele starke Turniere gewonnen hatte, wurde durch den Krieg nicht beeinträchtigt: er wohnte sorglos in den Vereinigten Staaten. Lasker, der schon ziemlich alt war und finanzielle Probleme hatte, nahm die Einladung für den Wettkampf in Havanna an - was ihm später leid tun sollte. Aber Capablanca war offen gesagt zu dieser Zeit einfach stärker...

ALEKHINE - CAPABIANCA 18,5-15,5

Buenos Aires, 16.09 - 29.11.1927

Jeder war sicher, daß Capablanca Aljechin schlagen würde, nur der Russe selbst und seine meist treuen Freunde waren anderer Meinung. Vor diesem Wettkampf gelang es Aljechin nie, eine Partie gegen den Kubaner zu gewinnen. Der auf sechs Gewinnpartien angelegte Wettkampf war außerordentlich lang und hart umkämpft, am Ende war derjenige Spieler erfolgreich, der gleichermaßen genial und arbeitsfähig war.

ALEKHINE - BOGOUJBOW 15,5-9,5

Germany - the Netherlands, 6.09 - 12.11.1929

Zwei russische Koryphäen - der eine mit einem deutschen, der andere mit einem französischen Paß - kreuzen durch Deutschland und die Niederlande im Kampf um den Weltmeistertitel im Schach...

Viele schöne Partien wurden in diesem Wettkampf gespielt. Aljechin war am Ende stärker als sein Gegner, aber nur in dem Maße, daß er seine ganze Kraft aufbringen mußte, um erfolgreich zu sein.

ALEKHINE - BOGOLJUBOW 15,5-10,5

Germany, 1.04- 14.06.1934

Dem Ergebnis nach verlief auch dieser Wettkampf nicht besonders interessant, allein die Partien sind für die Schachgeschichte kostbar. Aljechin war in dieser Zeit selbst seinen größten Konkurrenten einfach hoch überlegen.

EUWE - ALEKHINE 15,5-14,5

the Netherlands, 3.10- 15.12.1935

Für Euwe kam der Erfolg in diesem Wettkampf ganz unerwartet - er hatte lediglich gehofft, Aljechin möglichst starken Widerstand leisten zu können. Aber seine Freunde sagten ihm schon vor dem Duell, daß Aljechin eine Formkrise hatte und zu nervös war. Der Russe selbst kam Euwe zusätzlich zur Hilfe: Am Anfang unterschätzte er seinen Gegner und später gelang es ihm nicht mehr seine beste Leistung abzurufen.

ALEKHINE - EUWE 15,5-9,5

the Netherlands, 5.10-7.12.1937

Die eindrucksvolle Revanche Aljechins in diesem Wettkampf wurde scherzhaft auf folgende Weise kommentiert: "Der Russe lieh ihm seinen Titel für 2 Jahre". Er erkämpfte sich die Schachkrone zurück und nahm sie mit ins Grab. Der 2. Weltkrieg trug seinen Teil hierzu bei; was danach geschah, gehört zu einem neuen Abschnitt in der Geschichte des Schachs...

Weitere Informationen
Gewicht 630 g
Hersteller Russian Chess House
Breite 17 cm
Höhe 24,8 cm
Medium Buch
Erscheinungsjahr 2002
Autor Igor Berdichevsky
Reihe Die Wettkämpfe für die Schachweltmeisterschaft
Sprache Deutsch, Englisch, Russisch, Spanisch
ISBN-10 5946930079
ISBN-13 9785946930079
Seiten 311
Einband gebunden

008 Code System

009 Steinitz - Zukertort, 1886

029 Steinitz - Chigorin, 1889

043 Steinitz - Gunsberg. 1890/91

054 Steinitz - Chigorin, 1892

073 Steinitz - Lasker, 1894

089 Lasker - Steinitz, 1896/97

100 Lasker - Marshall, 1907

110 Lasker - Tarrasch, 1908

125 Lasker - Janowski, 1909

132 Lasker - Schlechter, 1910

145 Lasker - Janowski, 1910

154 Lasker - Capablanca, 1921

164 Capablanca - Alekhine, 1927

198 Alekhine - Bogoljubow, 1929

230 Alekhine - Bogoljubow, 1934

260 Alekhine - Euwe, 1935

285 Euwe - Alekhine, 1937

Sämtliche Partien der Weltmeisterschaftskämpfe von 1886 bis 1997 sind in den drei Bänden dieser neuen Anthologie gesammelt, ein aufwändiges und für den Leser interessantes Unterfangen, allerdings nicht ganz neu. Denn die "offiziellen" WM-Kämpfe von 1896-1985 sind schon einmal, vom Batsford-Verlag, in zwei Bänden im Jahre 1986 herausgegeben worden, damals von Wade, Whiteley und Keene (Band 2) sowie von Pablo Moran (Band 1), der genau den Zeitraum von 1886-1937 und damit die nachfolgenden Wettkämpfe behandelte wie der hier vorliegende Band 1 der neuen WM-Anthologie:

Steinitz - Zukertort, 1886

Steinitz - Chigorin, 1889

Steinitz - Gunsberg, 1890/91

Steinitz - Chigorin, 1892

Steinitz - Lasker, 1894

Lasker - Steinitz, 1896/97

Lasker - Marshall, 1907

Lasker - Tarrasch, 1908

Lasker - Janowski, 1909

Lasker - Schlechter, 1910

Lasker - Janowski, 1910

Lasker - Capablanca, 1921

Capablanca - Aljechin, 1927

Aljechin - Bogoljubow, 1929

Aljechin - Bogoljubow, 1934

Aljechin - Euwe, 1935

Euwe - Aljechin, 1937

Während Band 3 also eine echt neue Zusammenstellung darstellt, drängt sich für den Band 1 schon ein Vergleich zu Morans Sammlung auf. Beide Sammlungen bieten zu jedem Wettkampf jeweils eine kurze Einleitung. Diese Einleitungen sind bei Moran deutlich ausführlicher als die nur knappen und in vier Sprachen (Englisch, Deutsch, Russisch, Spanisch) wiedergegebenen Einleitungen der Moskauer Ausgabe. Anschließend folgen jeweils der Partienteil und am Buchende ein kurzer Eröffnungsindex. Auf Stellungnahmen der beteiligten Schachspieler, sonstige Erzählungen oder Anekdoten und vor allem Fotos von den Wettkämpfen verzichten (anders als bei "Umkämpfte Schachkrone", Sportverlag 1992, dort allerdings nur mit ausgewählten Partien) leider praktisch beide Herausgeber. Immerhin bringt die Moskauer Sammlung jeweils die Bilder der beiden Kontrahenten in Kleinformat. Im Vordergrund stehen also ganz und gar die vollständigen Partien und ihre Kommentierung.

Und dabei fällt die informatorähnliche Kommentierung bei der russischen Ausgabe insgesamt deutlich ausführlicher aus als bei Moran, der zudem gar keine Quellenangaben nennt. Berdichevsky und seine Mitarbeiter geben immerhin den Kommentator der Hauptquelle am Ende der Partie an und markieren eigene Stellungnahmen, wenngleich auch hier eine Quellenangabe fehlt - sicherlich ein echter Mangel bei einem schachhistorischen Werk. Manchmal kann man die Quelle z.B. dank diverser Olms-Reprints freilich selbst schnell ermitteln, etwa den Bericht von Tarrasch zum Wettkampf Lasker - Marshall 1907 (Olms-Band 97) oder den Bericht von Euwe und Aljechin zu ihrem Wettkampf 1935 (Olms Band 39), manchmal ist das wegen der Vielzahl der genannten Kommentatoren innerhalb eines Wettkampfes allerdings kaum mehr möglich. Ein Vergleich mit ermittelten Originalquellen ergibt jedenfalls, dass die Autoren der Moskauer Anthologie in aller Regel die Anmerkungen des angegebenen Hauptkommentators überprüft und gegebenenfalls durch andere Quellen und durch eigene Vorschläge erweitert und neu bewertet haben. Bisweilen freilich bringen sie sich und die Quellen nur sehr sparsam ein (z.B. Partie 130), bei der großen Partienanzahl wohl verständlich. Außerdem dienten oft vorwiegend die klassischen Quellen als Grundlage, neuere Artikel wie etwa die beiden bemerkenswerten und immerhin etwa jeweils fünfzig Seiten langen Artikel Hübners aus den Jahren 1998 und 1999 (publiziert in der Zeitschrift Schach) zu den Wettkämpfen Aljechin - Capablanca 1927 und Lasker - Schlechter 1910 wurden dagegen nicht ausgewertet. Entsprechend kommen denn auch die Feinheiten des Springerendspiels in der 4. Partie Aljechin - Capablanca überhaupt nicht zur Sprache und auch die Ergebnisse der dort auf 17 Seiten (!!) kommentierten 11. Partie hätten so manche Bewertung in Frage gestellt, um nur zwei Beispiele zu nennen. Ausführlich kommentiert also, aber nicht perfekt recherchiert. Das Druckbild der Partien und der Diagramme ist übrigens einwandfrei, dazu erfreut auch der stabile Festeinband.

Was die Idee einer ausführlichen Zusammenstellung der WM-Partien angeht, so ist diese natürlich lobenswert und für den Leser erfreulich, bekommt er doch einerseits viele gute und spannende Partien kommentiert präsentiert und kann andererseits auch Entwicklungen des Stils und Stileigenheiten der Kontrahenten erkennen, denkt man nur daran, welche passiven Stellungen mit fast allen Figuren auf der Grundreihe etwa Steinitz bisweilen in den Kämpfen gegen Gunsberg oder Tschigorin für den Mehrbesitz eines Bauern in Kauf nahm (vgl. etwa die Partie 12 gegen Gunsberg), ganz anders als der dynamische Stil Kasparows etwa in seiner berühmten 16. Partie 1985 gegen Karpow.

Insgesamt ist der erste Band dieser Trilogie also meines Erachtens eine sauber aufgemachte Zusammenstellung der oben genannten 17 WM-Kämpfe von 1886-1937 und dank der - vor allem gemessen an der Partienzahl -doch ausführlichen Partiekommentierung zugleich die bessere und zudem billigere Alternative zu Morans World Chess Championship. Einige schachgeschichtliche Zugaben, Fotos und genaue Quellenverweise sowie die Einarbeitung der Hübner-Artikel würden freilich einer späteren Neuauflage gut anstehen.

Helmut Riedl, Rochade Europa 07/2003

Mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Zeitschrift "Rochade Europa"