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Winning With Reverse Chess Stategy

150 Seiten, kartoniert, Thinkers' Press, 1. Auflage 1998.

21,95 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

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Have you ever been surprised by a move which came from nowhere, and did not necessarily sacrifice material? Redeployment moves can do that. A piece retreats from its present position with the idea of moving elsewhere to the advantage of the redeployer. Most of the truly great masters played such moves: Capablanca, Botvinnik, Fischer, Karpov, Kasparov, and others.

In a topical discussion of chess programs, Senior Master Reuter shows how even these invisible bit-pushers can solve the great problems of the masters from the past.

The opening, the middlegame, and the endgame are all fertile ground for backward moves. Enjoy a unique study of this chess phenomenon.

What do Nimzovich's Nh1!!, Capablanca's Bd7!!, Keres' Bb8!!, and Spassky's Nb1!! have in common? To begin, they are all exceptional redeployment maneuvers that played an instrumental role in obtaining a victory for each of these grandmasters. Secondly, these moves were all recognized as outstanding and were accordingly awarded two exclamation points. However, these fine backward moves also share one common thread. Succinctly put, annotators and GMs have been so impressed with these remarkable moves that they could not resist making commentary. Read Raymond Keene's Becoming a Grandmaster and you will find that he was both amazed and captivated by Nimzovich's Nh1!! and his bizarre ideas. He wrote an entire book entitled Awn Nimzowitsch: a Reappraisal, which any serious student of chess should read.

Pick up Irving Chernev's classic book Capablanca's Chess Endings and one can't help but think that Capa's Bd7!! was anything less than one of the most profound moves ever to grace the sixty four squares.

Review Hans Kmoch's comments in Keres' Best Games of Chess on the beautiful Bb8!! redeployment and the strength of the redeployment maneuver is attested.

Consider Gligoric's remarks on Spassky's absurd Nb1!! in his treatise on the "Match of the Century." The tremendous importance and disturbing effect of this mind-boggling move becomes apparent.

At any rate, the comments of chess authorities regarding spectacular redeployment schemes are a treasure to behold. If, as a connoisseur of chess, you should take a minute to consult your library about this subject you will likely be quite satisfied. The redeployment maneuver is a veritable annotator's paradise. Some of the words authors have used to describe the redeployment maneuver include: beautiful, strange, simple, eccentric, sophisticated... and of course, Steinitzian.

A redeployment or backward move is an unnatural one for many chessplayers as the human mind is trained to think forward. Consider Cafferty's Spassky's 100 Best Games of Chess regarding backward moves. "Psychologists who have studied chess players' thought patterns point out that the most difficult moves to envisage are those which retreat a well-placed piece. Forward towards the enemy is the obvious path, but the real master is aware of all the possibilities." Thus, aggressive moves, such as using a Bishop to pin a Knight to a Queen or placing a Rook on the seventh rank, come naturally to most chessplayers. However, strong unprovoked retreating moves are not to be expected from a mere amateur. Fortunately, skill in moving the chess pieces backward can be learned, and is necessary if one expects to rise to the rank of master.

From a historical perspective one of the earliest mentions of the concept of backward moves in chess literature is included in a collection of Steinitz's games by Steinitz and Devide (1974). Steinitz's encounter with Lasker from the Hastings tournament in which he experiments with moving some of his pieces backward has been included in this text as it is especially illustrative of the redeployment concept.

Chapter One is a retrospective on the life and chess career of William Steinitz. Steinitz was the first world champion, and held the title from 1886 to 1894. He was a controversial figure in the chess world because he was one of the first chess masters to employ redeployment maneuvers in chess strategy. Thus, no study on redeployment would be complete without a review of his play. Steinitz's games provide some excellent examples of successful redeployment strategy on the chessboard.

As far as modern grandmaster chess goes, the games of ex-world champions Bobby Fischer and Anatoly Karpov contain many excellent examples of redeployment maneuvers. The uncanny ability of these players to find surprising backward moves is a distinct characteristic of their play.

Some of the backward moves in this text may strike you as bizarre, surprising, and even incomprehensible! However, with study and practice you should be able to find the logic hidden behind even the most complex of redeployment maneuvers.

In Chapter Two the underlying logic behind redeployment maneuvers is revealed. Common redeployment maneuvers in the standard chess openings are discussed. In addition, the famous backward moves of great players such as Steinitz, Capablanca, Rubinstein, Smyslov, and Larsen are mentioned.

In Chapter Three middlegame positions have been selected from master play which are especially illustrative of the redeployment concept. Complete game scores have been provided so the reader can follow the action. Comments related to the games have been confined for the most part to the redeployment maneuvers. To facilitate learning, the games are divided into separate categories such as: redeploy and then attack; maneuvering; defense and then attack; forced redeployment; redeployment in the heat of battle; the back rank lineup, long range planning; redeployment and setting traps; and unusual redeployments.

In Chapter Four the question of redeployment maneuvers in the endgame is breached. Selected studies of Reti, Dedrle, and Kling and Horwitz are used to demonstrate that even in the endgame situations may arise where moving a piece or pawn forward is not the best course of action.

In Chapter Five the author shares with you some of his personal experiences with redeployment maneuvers. Games which illustrate a variety of redeployment themes have been carefully selected. Each game is accompanied by a story line and is fully annotated. Among these games are encounters against the following competition: a two-time U.S. champion, a few State Champions, a man who can claim he once beat Bobby Fischer, and many more!

In Chapter Six the reader is given an opportunity to match wits with the masters. Sixty practice exercises are provided so one can get first-hand experience in finding redeployment maneuvers. The test positions chosen were selected primarily from actual grandmaster play.

In Chapter Seven a computer chess program was given an opportunity to find the recommended redeployment for the above sixty exercises. An analysis of the program's responses is conducted and results of the study are quite interesting. The reader is encouraged to try some of these exercises on their own chess program.

Chapter Eight contains all the games of the spectacular "Man vs. Machine" match between world champion Garry Kasparov and IBM's supercomputer Deeper Blue. This battle between icons generated a tremendous amount of interest among both chess players and the general public. Each game in the match is reviewed from the perspective of the important redeployment maneuvers that occur.

A discussion of chess style and redeployment is contained in Chapter Nine. The primary focus of this chapter is on the following question: Do most masters and grandmasters employ strange and curious redeployment maneuvers or is the use of these backward moves relegated to the hands of a few eccentric chess masters?

When you finish reading this book I sincerely hope that you develop a great deal of appreciation for redeployment maneuvers because knowledge about this one type of move will strengthen your overall game considerably. Paying a little extra attention to backward oriented moves will also make you a much more difficult opponent at the chess board.

Keep on checking!

William Reuter September 1998

Have you ever been surprised by a move which came from nowhere, and did not necessarily sacrifice material? Redeployment moves can do that. A piece retreats from its present position with the idea of moving elsewhere to the advantage of the redeployer. Most of the truly great masters played such moves: Capablanca, Botvinnik, Fischer, Karpov, Kasparov, and others.

In a topical discussion of chess programs, Senior Master Reuter shows how even these invisible bit-pushers can solve the great problems of the masters from the past.

The opening, the middlegame, and the endgame are all fertile ground for backward moves. Enjoy a unique study of this chess phenomenon.

What do Nimzovich's Nh1!!, Capablanca's Bd7!!, Keres' Bb8!!, and Spassky's Nb1!! have in common? To begin, they are all exceptional redeployment maneuvers that played an instrumental role in obtaining a victory for each of these grandmasters. Secondly, these moves were all recognized as outstanding and were accordingly awarded two exclamation points. However, these fine backward moves also share one common thread. Succinctly put, annotators and GMs have been so impressed with these remarkable moves that they could not resist making commentary. Read Raymond Keene's Becoming a Grandmaster and you will find that he was both amazed and captivated by Nimzovich's Nh1!! and his bizarre ideas. He wrote an entire book entitled Awn Nimzowitsch: a Reappraisal, which any serious student of chess should read.

Pick up Irving Chernev's classic book Capablanca's Chess Endings and one can't help but think that Capa's Bd7!! was anything less than one of the most profound moves ever to grace the sixty four squares.

Review Hans Kmoch's comments in Keres' Best Games of Chess on the beautiful Bb8!! redeployment and the strength of the redeployment maneuver is attested.

Consider Gligoric's remarks on Spassky's absurd Nb1!! in his treatise on the "Match of the Century." The tremendous importance and disturbing effect of this mind-boggling move becomes apparent.

At any rate, the comments of chess authorities regarding spectacular redeployment schemes are a treasure to behold. If, as a connoisseur of chess, you should take a minute to consult your library about this subject you will likely be quite satisfied. The redeployment maneuver is a veritable annotator's paradise. Some of the words authors have used to describe the redeployment maneuver include: beautiful, strange, simple, eccentric, sophisticated... and of course, Steinitzian.

A redeployment or backward move is an unnatural one for many chessplayers as the human mind is trained to think forward. Consider Cafferty's Spassky's 100 Best Games of Chess regarding backward moves. "Psychologists who have studied chess players' thought patterns point out that the most difficult moves to envisage are those which retreat a well-placed piece. Forward towards the enemy is the obvious path, but the real master is aware of all the possibilities." Thus, aggressive moves, such as using a Bishop to pin a Knight to a Queen or placing a Rook on the seventh rank, come naturally to most chessplayers. However, strong unprovoked retreating moves are not to be expected from a mere amateur. Fortunately, skill in moving the chess pieces backward can be learned, and is necessary if one expects to rise to the rank of master.

From a historical perspective one of the earliest mentions of the concept of backward moves in chess literature is included in a collection of Steinitz's games by Steinitz and Devide (1974). Steinitz's encounter with Lasker from the Hastings tournament in which he experiments with moving some of his pieces backward has been included in this text as it is especially illustrative of the redeployment concept.

Chapter One is a retrospective on the life and chess career of William Steinitz. Steinitz was the first world champion, and held the title from 1886 to 1894. He was a controversial figure in the chess world because he was one of the first chess masters to employ redeployment maneuvers in chess strategy. Thus, no study on redeployment would be complete without a review of his play. Steinitz's games provide some excellent examples of successful redeployment strategy on the chessboard.

As far as modern grandmaster chess goes, the games of ex-world champions Bobby Fischer and Anatoly Karpov contain many excellent examples of redeployment maneuvers. The uncanny ability of these players to find surprising backward moves is a distinct characteristic of their play.

Some of the backward moves in this text may strike you as bizarre, surprising, and even incomprehensible! However, with study and practice you should be able to find the logic hidden behind even the most complex of redeployment maneuvers.

In Chapter Two the underlying logic behind redeployment maneuvers is revealed. Common redeployment maneuvers in the standard chess openings are discussed. In addition, the famous backward moves of great players such as Steinitz, Capablanca, Rubinstein, Smyslov, and Larsen are mentioned.

In Chapter Three middlegame positions have been selected from master play which are especially illustrative of the redeployment concept. Complete game scores have been provided so the reader can follow the action. Comments related to the games have been confined for the most part to the redeployment maneuvers. To facilitate learning, the games are divided into separate categories such as: redeploy and then attack; maneuvering; defense and then attack; forced redeployment; redeployment in the heat of battle; the back rank lineup, long range planning; redeployment and setting traps; and unusual redeployments.

In Chapter Four the question of redeployment maneuvers in the endgame is breached. Selected studies of Reti, Dedrle, and Kling and Horwitz are used to demonstrate that even in the endgame situations may arise where moving a piece or pawn forward is not the best course of action.

In Chapter Five the author shares with you some of his personal experiences with redeployment maneuvers. Games which illustrate a variety of redeployment themes have been carefully selected. Each game is accompanied by a story line and is fully annotated. Among these games are encounters against the following competition: a two-time U.S. champion, a few State Champions, a man who can claim he once beat Bobby Fischer, and many more!

In Chapter Six the reader is given an opportunity to match wits with the masters. Sixty practice exercises are provided so one can get first-hand experience in finding redeployment maneuvers. The test positions chosen were selected primarily from actual grandmaster play.

In Chapter Seven a computer chess program was given an opportunity to find the recommended redeployment for the above sixty exercises. An analysis of the program's responses is conducted and results of the study are quite interesting. The reader is encouraged to try some of these exercises on their own chess program.

Chapter Eight contains all the games of the spectacular "Man vs. Machine" match between world champion Garry Kasparov and IBM's supercomputer Deeper Blue. This battle between icons generated a tremendous amount of interest among both chess players and the general public. Each game in the match is reviewed from the perspective of the important redeployment maneuvers that occur.

A discussion of chess style and redeployment is contained in Chapter Nine. The primary focus of this chapter is on the following question: Do most masters and grandmasters employ strange and curious redeployment maneuvers or is the use of these backward moves relegated to the hands of a few eccentric chess masters?

When you finish reading this book I sincerely hope that you develop a great deal of appreciation for redeployment maneuvers because knowledge about this one type of move will strengthen your overall game considerably. Paying a little extra attention to backward oriented moves will also make you a much more difficult opponent at the chess board.

Keep on checking!

William Reuter September 1998

Details
Sprache Englisch
Autor Reuter, William
Verlag Thinkers' Press
Auflage 1.
Medium Buch
Gewicht 200 g
Breite 15,3 cm
Höhe 23 cm
Seiten 150
ISBN-10 0938650955
ISBN-13 9780938650959
Erscheinungsjahr 1998
Einband kartoniert
Inhalte

iv Introduction

008 1. William Steinitz - A Man of Controversy!

016 2. Redeployment in the Opening

028 3. Exploring Redeployment in the Middlegame

028 Redeploy and then Attack

031 Maneuvering

035 Defense and then Attack

036 Forced Redeployment

038 Redeployment in the Heat of Battle

040 The Back Rank Lineup

044 Long Range Planning

047 The Rook Lift

049 Redeployment and Setting Traps

050 Unusual Redeployments

053 4. Moving Backward in the Endgame

057 5. Backward to Victory

109 6. Exercises in Redeployment

127 7. Chess Programs and Redeployment

134 8. A Backward View of Kasparov vs. Deeper Blue

143 9. Chess Style and Redeployment

146 About the Author

147 Bibliography

148 Index of Complete Games

149 Index of Openings

150 Colophon

Winning With Reverse Chess Stategy

EUR

21.95