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Art.-Nr.: LXGERTC
Vergriffen

Thinkers' Chess

151 Seiten, kartoniert, Thinkers' Press, 1995.

7,95 €
inkl. 7% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

Dieser Artikel ist sowohl bei uns als auch beim Verlag bzw. Hersteller ausverkauft. Wir können ihn daher auch nicht mehr bestellen.

Can your chess use some improvement? Chessco, one of the country's leading chess retailers, asked its customers to send in "interesting" games they have played to be annotated by Gerzadowicz, author of the very successful Journal of a Chess Master. Twenty six were chosen, one for each letter of the alphabet.The games were then grouped according to the following motifs: Development, On Exchanging, Pawn Play and Weak

Squares, Endings, and Attacks Good and Bad.

With his own literary style, humor and puns, Gerzadowicz delves into the intricacies of each game and offers suggestions, compliments excellent play, and offers real

tips which will improve your game - starting now!

Adding an additional game of his own, Gerz charts this compendium of games with notes, thoughts, inspiration, and talent gleaned from the front-line field troops of Chessco and Thinkers' Press. This is real chess as it is played and understood by the real chess player - YOU!

Introduction :

How best to learn about chess? How best to teach chess? Doubtless there's no best answer.

The general "textbooks" - the Nimzovitch, the Pachman, the Kotov - are all fine, and probably necessary. So, too, are opening, middlegame, and endgame books. They all work - if you do!

But those books are all to a degree contrived, artificial, fragmentary. And that's not a totally Bad Thing.

But I've always more enjoyed books of complete games - "stories" with a Beginning, a Middle, and an End. The drama of the human struggle captures me more than any instructional text can.

But how useful is this? That can depend on the extent and depth of the notes. I went through all the old textbooks, but what I remember most enjoying and profiting from were the game collections with long and wordy annotations. Not masses of variations, but words telling you what's going on. The great old Edward Lasker books were particular early favorites. Much of Reti is good in this regard, as is Botvinnik and Bronstein's Zurich '53, and Tal on his first title match, and Cecil Purdy from Down Under. Best of all - for me - was the three-volume Grandmaster of Chess series by Paul Keres. He said it -"The notes on the various games should be, I decided, as exhaustively done as possible so as to increase the value of the book as a manual of instruction."

That's what I try to do here.

Journal of a Chess Master tended toward that approach; but with a single player's games, his style is a limiting factor. I wanted the widest possible range of games.

But where could we get these games? From Bob Long's CHESSCO customers! They've been buying his books for 25 years; about time they got into one.

When we began soliciting games, I didn't know what to expect. I hoped I wouldn't have to gussy 'em up too much to make them presentable in good company. I needn't have worried. It did not become a case of me making them look good - if anything, I fear it

may be the other way around.

We did not have room to use all of the games submitted. I apologize to those whose games we left out. Many of them were the equal of the bulk of what follows, but were left out for "technical," and even arbitrary, reasons - opening duplication and the like. They may appear in a second volume.

The games that follow fell into certain categories, and are grouped accordingly. But they may be played over in any order with equal benefit, and have been indexed by opening, ECO code, etc.

Keres again: "With this I hand my work over to the reader. I hope it will find welcome acceptance not only as reading for tournament players but also as a manual for the less advanced player."

Can your chess use some improvement? Chessco, one of the country's leading chess retailers, asked its customers to send in "interesting" games they have played to be annotated by Gerzadowicz, author of the very successful Journal of a Chess Master. Twenty six were chosen, one for each letter of the alphabet.The games were then grouped according to the following motifs: Development, On Exchanging, Pawn Play and Weak

Squares, Endings, and Attacks Good and Bad.

With his own literary style, humor and puns, Gerzadowicz delves into the intricacies of each game and offers suggestions, compliments excellent play, and offers real

tips which will improve your game - starting now!

Adding an additional game of his own, Gerz charts this compendium of games with notes, thoughts, inspiration, and talent gleaned from the front-line field troops of Chessco and Thinkers' Press. This is real chess as it is played and understood by the real chess player - YOU!

Introduction :

How best to learn about chess? How best to teach chess? Doubtless there's no best answer.

The general "textbooks" — the Nimzovitch, the Pachman, the Kotov — are all fine, and probably necessary. So, too, are opening, middlegame, and endgame books. They all work — if you do!

But those books are all to a degree contrived, artificial, fragmentary. And that's not a totally Bad Thing.

But I've always more enjoyed books of complete games — "stories" with a Beginning, a Middle, and an End. The drama of the human struggle captures me more than any instructional text can.

But how useful is this? That can depend on the extent and depth of the notes. I went through all the old textbooks, but what I remember most enjoying and profiting from were the game collections with long and wordy annotations. Not masses of variations, but words telling you what's going on. The great old Edward Lasker books were particular early favorites. Much of Reti is good in this regard, as is Botvinnik and Bronstein's Zurich '53, and Tal on his first title match, and Cecil Purdy from Down Under. Best of all - for me - was the three-volume Grandmaster of Chess series by Paul Keres. He said it -"The notes on the various games should be, I decided, as exhaustively done as possible so as to increase the value of the book as a manual of instruction."

That's what I try to do here.

Journal of a Chess Master tended toward that approach; but with a single player's games, his style is a limiting factor. I wanted the widest possible range of games.

But where could we get these games? From Bob Long's CHESSCO customers! They've been buying his books for 25 years; about time they got into one.

When we began soliciting games, I didn't know what to expect. I hoped I wouldn't have to gussy 'em up too much to make them presentable in good company. I needn't have worried. It did not become a case of me making them look good — if anything, I fear it

may be the other way around.

We did not have room to use all of the games submitted. I apologize to those whose games we left out. Many of them were the equal of the bulk of what follows, but were left out for "technical," and even arbitrary, reasons — opening duplication and the like. They may appear in a second volume.

The games that follow fell into certain categories, and are grouped accordingly. But they may be played over in any order with equal benefit, and have been indexed by opening, ECO code, etc.

Keres again: "With this I hand my work over to the reader. I hope it will find welcome acceptance not only as reading for tournament players but also as a manual for the less advanced player."

Details
Sprache Englisch
Verlag Thinkers' Press
Medium Buch
Gewicht 200 g
Breite 15,1 cm
Höhe 21,7 cm
Seiten 151
ISBN-10 0938650653
Erscheinungsjahr 1995
Einband kartoniert
Inhalte

PART I - Development

002 A Teraoka-Rea: Vienna Game

009 B Woodworth-Marconnet: Grü nfeld

013 C Ives-Dennis: Pirc

018 D Hecht-Ash: Trompowsky

021 E Hilbert-Lukacs: King's Indian

027 F Tempske-Kostanski: Ponziani

PART II - On Exchanging

033 G Borchard-Hartmayer: Colle

036 H Tykodi-Gelinas: Budapest

040 I Reich-Williams: Ruy Lopez

045 J Kittsley-Pukel: Stonewall Attack

PART III - Pawn Play and Weak Squares

051 K Millett-Gumienny: Pirc

056 L Lawrence-Ziegler: English

062 M Long-Beelman: French

070 N Smith-Zintgraff: King's Indian

074 O Stroud-Hawkins: English

078 P Viens-Tucker: King's Gambit Declined

PART IV - Endings

087 Q Savage-Djuric: Ruy Lopez

095 R Lee-Colby: Sicilian

099 S Tanaka-Yarmulnik: Bird's

109 T Hanson-Lemansky: Dutch

PART V - Attacks Good and Bad

116 U Sanger-Martin: Dutch

121 V Holden-Barth: Nimzovich

129 W Capron-Dupee: Modern

135 X Probasco-Baker: Petroff

140 Y Matthaey-Johnson: Alekhine's

144 Z Herrera-Lester: Two Knight's

149 Envoi Whiteside-Gerzadowicz: Modern

152 Colophon

153 Catalog

Thinkers' Chess

EUR

7.95