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The Scandinavian / 2nd edition

176 Seiten, kartoniert, Reprint, Everyman, 2004, Erstauflage 1997

Aus der Reihe »Opening Guides«

17,61 €
Inkl. 5% MwSt., zzgl. Versandkosten

From a theoretical backwater to a fully blown main line opening, the rise of the Scandinavian Defence (1 e4 d5) has been nothing short of meteoric. Over the past fifteen years the Scandinavian has become more and more popular both at club and Grandmaster level. It even managed to obtain an ultimate seal of approval when Vishy Anand employed it in his World Championship match with Garry Kasparov!

In this book Grandmaster John Emms explains the strategies and tactics of this dynamic and fashionable opening. Through the use of model games for both sides, the author provides a thorough grounding in the key ideas, so that players of all standards can quickly and confidently begin to use the Scandinavian in their own games. This book provides a complete update of Emms's original and best-selling edition of The Scandinavian, published in 1997. Since then there have been many new and important discoveries from both sides of the board, and these are included here.

  • Ideal for club and tournament players
  • Explains the basic elements, strategies and tactics for both sides
  • Written by a leading expert on the Scandinavian
  • Provides everything you need to know to start playing the opening straight away

After the first edition of The Scandinavian came out in early 1997, the popularity of this opening (at least in the number of games played) rose steadily. In my database there are over 3,000 Scandinavian games played in 1997, over 4,000 in 1998 and over 5,000 in 1999 (although it's true the total number of games recorded also rose). In 1997 the Scandinavian (or the Center Counter, if you live the other side of the Atlantic) received substantial coverage: as well as my book, there was Matthias Wahls' Modernes Skandinavisch, a very impressive repertoire book for Black players based on 2...Qxd5 and ...Bf5 (sadly, this is only published in German). Other material published around the same time includes Center Counter Defense: The Portuguese Variation, by Selby Anderson. A few years earlier a whole book devoted to just a subvariation of the Scandinavian would have been unthinkable!

A revealing statistic, again only according to databases, is that there have been nearly twice as many Scandinavian games played between 1997 and the current day than there were before 1997. Of course this doesn't take into account the increased availability of more recent games, but this fact is still quite staggering. In effect, you could say that the theory of the Scandinavian has trebled in the last seven years! Bearing this in mind, I thought that now was right time to update (or, perhaps more accurately, overhaul) my 1997 work.

Although in general I was very happy with the first edition, this was my first serious attempt at writing a book and, looking back now, there were things I would have done differently. It's been nice to able to rewrite the book with so many more resources available this time around. Those who have the first edition will notice here the substantial number of changes of opinion and analytical amendments. I soon gave up highlighting all of these simply because it used up too much space, and space consideration, as always, has been a serious issue.

I've collected and checked games and analysis from a wide range of sources, the most im­portant of which are Chess Informant, ChessBase Magazine, New in Chess, plus the chess databases Mega Database 2004 and Mega Corr 3 (a database of over 500,000 correspondence games). I was genuinely surprised by the number of theoretically important correspondence games there have been in the Scandinavian, and these can be seen throughout the book.

I've tried to attribute analysis and assessments accordingly, except when these are totally obvious or when I've reached the same conclusion independently. I've also occasionally omit­ted game references (mainly to save space), especially when a number of games have reached the same position. It's worth mentioning a list of players who have in the past made consider­able contributions to the theory of the Scandinavian. This includes Wahls, Karsten Müller, Maljutin, Curt Hansen, Dautov, Rogers, Larsen, Fries-Nielsen, Taylor, Sermek, Kurajica, Dzindzichashvili, Prie, Andrew Martin, Bellmann, Soppe, Kamsky, Finkel, Smagin, Gipslis and Alekseev. Apologies to those I've accidentally missed out.

Given that I've been armed with a team of computers, I hope that there are not too many analytical errors, but I realise that's it's impossible to avoid a few creeping in. The main games are generally chosen with entertainment in mind and the results of these games are not neces­sarily indicative of how well or badly a certain variation is doing. Often what I consider to be the critical line in a variation can be found within the notes of a game rather than in the game itself (a game may be theoretically important, but at the same time it could also last 120 moves, of which perhaps only 20 are of real interest).

To finish with, some acknowledgements. I would like to thank Jonathan Rowson, John Shaw, Jonathan Speelman and Michael Read for their analysis and opinions on certain posi­tions. I would also like to thank all the readers who have contacted me since the first edition with analysis and comments, and I would welcome any new comments on this edition - you can contact me via Everyman Chess.

Good luck with your Scandinavian adventures!

John Emms, Kent, November 2004

From a theoretical backwater to a fully blown main line opening, the rise of the Scandinavian Defence (1 e4 d5) has been nothing short of meteoric. Over the past fifteen years the Scandinavian has become more and more popular both at club and Grandmaster level. It even managed to obtain an ultimate seal of approval when Vishy Anand employed it in his World Championship match with Garry Kasparov!

In this book Grandmaster John Emms explains the strategies and tactics of this dynamic and fashionable opening. Through the use of model games for both sides, the author provides a thorough grounding in the key ideas, so that players of all standards can quickly and confidently begin to use the Scandinavian in their own games. This book provides a complete update of Emms's original and best-selling edition of The Scandinavian, published in 1997. Since then there have been many new and important discoveries from both sides of the board, and these are included here.

  • Ideal for club and tournament players
  • Explains the basic elements, strategies and tactics for both sides
  • Written by a leading expert on the Scandinavian
  • Provides everything you need to know to start playing the opening straight away

After the first edition of The Scandinavian came out in early 1997, the popularity of this opening (at least in the number of games played) rose steadily. In my database there are over 3,000 Scandinavian games played in 1997, over 4,000 in 1998 and over 5,000 in 1999 (although it's true the total number of games recorded also rose). In 1997 the Scandinavian (or the Center Counter, if you live the other side of the Atlantic) received substantial coverage: as well as my book, there was Matthias Wahls' Modernes Skandinavisch, a very impressive repertoire book for Black players based on 2...Qxd5 and ...Bf5 (sadly, this is only published in German). Other material published around the same time includes Center Counter Defense: The Portuguese Variation, by Selby Anderson. A few years earlier a whole book devoted to just a subvariation of the Scandinavian would have been unthinkable!

A revealing statistic, again only according to databases, is that there have been nearly twice as many Scandinavian games played between 1997 and the current day than there were before 1997. Of course this doesn't take into account the increased availability of more recent games, but this fact is still quite staggering. In effect, you could say that the theory of the Scandinavian has trebled in the last seven years! Bearing this in mind, I thought that now was right time to update (or, perhaps more accurately, overhaul) my 1997 work.

Although in general I was very happy with the first edition, this was my first serious attempt at writing a book and, looking back now, there were things I would have done differently. It's been nice to able to rewrite the book with so many more resources available this time around. Those who have the first edition will notice here the substantial number of changes of opinion and analytical amendments. I soon gave up highlighting all of these simply because it used up too much space, and space consideration, as always, has been a serious issue.

I've collected and checked games and analysis from a wide range of sources, the most im­portant of which are Chess Informant, ChessBase Magazine, New in Chess, plus the chess databases Mega Database 2004 and Mega Corr 3 (a database of over 500,000 correspondence games). I was genuinely surprised by the number of theoretically important correspondence games there have been in the Scandinavian, and these can be seen throughout the book.

I've tried to attribute analysis and assessments accordingly, except when these are totally obvious or when I've reached the same conclusion independently. I've also occasionally omit­ted game references (mainly to save space), especially when a number of games have reached the same position. It's worth mentioning a list of players who have in the past made consider­able contributions to the theory of the Scandinavian. This includes Wahls, Karsten Müller, Maljutin, Curt Hansen, Dautov, Rogers, Larsen, Fries-Nielsen, Taylor, Sermek, Kurajica, Dzindzichashvili, Prie, Andrew Martin, Bellmann, Soppe, Kamsky, Finkel, Smagin, Gipslis and Alekseev. Apologies to those I've accidentally missed out.

Given that I've been armed with a team of computers, I hope that there are not too many analytical errors, but I realise that's it's impossible to avoid a few creeping in. The main games are generally chosen with entertainment in mind and the results of these games are not neces­sarily indicative of how well or badly a certain variation is doing. Often what I consider to be the critical line in a variation can be found within the notes of a game rather than in the game itself (a game may be theoretically important, but at the same time it could also last 120 moves, of which perhaps only 20 are of real interest).

To finish with, some acknowledgements. I would like to thank Jonathan Rowson, John Shaw, Jonathan Speelman and Michael Read for their analysis and opinions on certain posi­tions. I would also like to thank all the readers who have contacted me since the first edition with analysis and comments, and I would welcome any new comments on this edition - you can contact me via Everyman Chess.

Good luck with your Scandinavian adventures!

John Emms, Kent, November 2004

Weitere Informationen
Gewicht 300 g
Hersteller Everyman
Breite 15,3 cm
Höhe 23,3 cm
Medium Buch
Erscheinungsjahr 2004
Autor John Emms
Reihe Opening Guides
Sprache Englisch
ISBN-10 1857443756
ISBN-13 9781857443752
Jahr der Erstauflage 1997
Seiten 176
Einband kartoniert
Diagramme 200

004 Bibliography

005 Preface

007 Introduction

1 e4 d5 2 exd5 Qxd5

014 1 The Main Line: 3 Nc3 Qa5 4 d4 Nf6 5 Nf3 Bf5 6 Bd2 c6 7 Bc4 e6 8 Qe2

036 2 Main Line Alternatives: 3 Nc3 Qa5 4 d4 Nf6 5 Nf3 c6

060 3 Fifth Move Alternatives: 3 Nc3 Qa5 4 d4 Nf6

075 4 Fourth Move Alternatives: 3 Nc3 Qa5

088 5 Second and Third Move Alternatives

1 e4 d5 2 exd5 Nf6

110 6 The Main Line with 3 d4 Nxd5

128 7 The Portugese Variation (3 d4 Bg4!?)

144 8 3 Bb5+

155 9 Scandinavian Gambit and Panov Attack: (3 c4 c6)

166 10 Icelandic Gambit: 3 c4 e6

175 Index of Complete Games

Rezension zur Vorauflage!

Einführung in eine Spezialvariante Der Verlag The Chess Press, Brighton, begann mit drei neuen Werken namhafter Großmeister (weitere erschienen über das Slawische Damengambit und über die Taimanow-Variante im Sizilianer) zum Jahresanfang 1997 seine vielversprechende Eröffnungsbuchreihe "Opening Guides". Die Gestaltung der Bücher ist gefällig, und auch die strikte Einhaltung eines allen Bänden gemeinsamen Konzeptes beweist professionelle Qualitäten.

Das Thema Skandinavisch, 1. e4 d5, wird in elf Kapiteln anhand von insgesamt 82 Partiebeispielen durchleuchtet. Fünf Kapitel betreffen 2. exd5 Dxd5, die übrigen sechs befassen sich mit 2. ... Sf6.

Besonders interessierte mich die Begegnung Penrose - Goldenberg, weil ich diese in Kaissiber 1, Seite 13, selber unter die Lupe nahm. In solchen Fällen fällt es einem leichter, den Wert fremder Analysen zu beurteilen.

Meine Verstärkung 18. ... Tg8! entdeckte Emms nicht, er gibt statt dessen zu einem früheren Moment in der Partie eine Empfehlung für Weiß, die von Przewoznik stamme: 17. Dh3! Kc6 usw. Dies ist allerdings unmöglich, denn auf c6 steht ein schwarzer Bauer. Es ist mir auch weder gelungen, eine Korrektur der Zugfolge vorzunehmen noch die Kommentierung durch Przewoznik zu lokalisieren. Die Variante steht unter einem Diagramm; der Lektor muß folglich ein bißchen geschlafen haben. Oder man vertraut heute einfach zu sehr auf die Fehlerlosigkeit des Eingabeweges über Schachdatenbanken.

Insgesamt ist die Arbeit wegen der ausführlichen Erläuterungen als Einführung nützlich, leider sind aber wenige neue Erkenntnisse enthalten. Bei dem anvisierten geringen Umfang der Büchlein und der lockeren Gestaltung mit vielen Diagrammen konnte dies von den Verfassern der Reihe ohnehin kaum geleistet werden.

Christopher Lutz weist in seiner Besprechung dieses Titels (Schach 5/97) übrigens darauf hin, daß demnächst ein Buch über 2. ... Dxd5 von dem Hamburger GM Matthias Wahls erscheinen soll.

Stefan Bücker

____________________________________________________ Die Skandinavische Verteidigung erfreut sich in letzter Zeit einer ge­wissen Aufmerksamkeit. Bereits in der letzten Ausgabe konnten wir Ih­nen das neue Buch "the scandinavian defence" von James Plaskett vorstel­len. Wie dabei angekündigt werden wir uns diesmal das ebenfalls neu erschienene "the scandinavian - 2nd edition" von John Emms anschauen.

Es handelt sich hierbei um eine völlig überarbeitete Ausgabe sei­nes Buches "the scandinavian" aus dem Jahr 1997. Seitdem hat sich in dieser Eröffnung einiges getan, und so zeichnet sich dieses neue Buch durch so viele Veränderungen, Korrekturen und neue Varianten aus, dass man es kaum noch mit der ersten Ausgabe vergleichen kann.

GM John Emms verfolgt in seinem Buch ein einfaches Schema: zunächst werden die absoluten Hauptvarianten untersucht, dann folgen systematisch die Abweichungen beider Seiten auf dem Weg dorthin.

Emms beginnt mit 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Dxd5 und der gewöhnlich als Haupt­variante angesehenen Zugfolge 3.Sc3 Da5 4.d4 Sf6 5.Sf3 c6 6.Lc4 Lf5 7.Ld2 e6 8.De2.

Wie in den weiteren Kapiteln des Buches gibt Emms zunächst in einer kurzen Einführung eine Orientierung über des entsprechende Material, dann folgt eine Zusammenstellung von überwiegend sehr aktuellen Mus­terpartien, die die wichtigsten Ent­wicklungen und Varianten zeigen.

In den sehr ausführlichen Kom­mentaren zu diesen Partien erläutert der Autor nicht nur die Partien selbst, sondern er stellt darin auch die Theo­rie zu weniger wichtigen oder noch nicht etablierten Varianten vor.

Im zweiten Kapitel untersucht Emms Alternativen zur Hauptvarian­te, also z.B. 8.Se4, 8.Sd5, 6.Ld2 und 6.Se5.

Weitere Kapitel beschäftigen sich mit den Alternativen für beide Seiten im fünften, vierten und dritten Zug, wonach es mit dem zweiten großen Block über 2...Sf6 weitergeht.

Auch hier beschäftigt sich Emms zunächst mit der Hauptvariante nach 3.d4 Sxd5, danach folgen die Alter­nativen wie z.B. 3.d4 Lg4, 3.Lb5+ oder 3.c4. Zu letzterem muss noch etwas gesagt werden. Emms hat die­ses Thema in zwei Kapitel über 3...c6 und 3...e6 aufgespaltet. Da nach 3...c6 gewöhnlich eine Überleitung in den Panow-Angriff aus der Caro-Kann-Verteidigung erfolgt, begnügen sich die meisten Skandinavisch-Autoren an dieser Stelle mit einem entsprechenden Hinweis und konzen­trieren sich auf die "rein skandinavi­schen" Varianten.

John Emms ist eine sehr erfreuliche Ausnahme, denn er stellt immerhin ein zuverlässiges Repertoire gegen den Panow-Angriff vor, so dass Schwarz-Spieler mit diesem Buch ein komplettes Repertoire gegen 1.e4 zu­sammenstellen können.

Dies soll jedoch nicht bedeuten, dass der Autor eine Vorliebe für Schwarz zeigt. Er zeichnet sich viel­mehr durch eine überzeugende Objektivität aus, trifft klare Bewer­tungen und stützt das alles auf viele und gut analysierte Partiefragmente aus der Praxis.

Im Vergleich zu Plasketts Buch schneidet Emms nach meiner Mei­nung klar besser ab. Das Buch ist trotz umfangreicheren Materials übersichtlicher, die Analysen sind überzeugender, und die Gewichtung der Varianten entspricht in etwa ihrer Bedeutung.

Einen Pluspunkt bietet Plasketts Buch lediglich für Leser, die sich für die Varianten 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Dxd5 3.Sc3 Dd6 oder 2...Sf6 3.d4 Lg4 interessieren. Mit Grundkenntnissen in Englisch ist das Buch problemlos zu meistern.

Schachmarkt 03/2005